dead president


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dead president

n. a piece of U.S. paper money. (Refers to the pictures of presidents on the bills.) This silly magazine costs three dead presidents!
See also: dead, president
References in periodicals archive ?
All they care about is the bottom line, the profit margin, the moolah, the green stuff, the what-have-you-done-for-me-lately, the bread, the scratch, the dead presidents, it's all about the Benjamins (baby)C*and being nice is nice-but-not-necessary.
He writes, "Blank paper you could at least write on, but governments manage to make it completely worthless by printing pictures of dead presidents on it.
Ninth degree, burned stardom dust of dead presidents.
The Chinese get the dead presidents from selling products to live Americans, who seem ready to consume anything that comes their way.
A high school student, she remembered, wanted to know the average speed of funeral trains--the kind dead presidents rode--versus the average speed of a vacation train through Copper Canyon.
Sure, you could spend gobs of money taking Aunt Mimi and her three disastrous offspring to the Newport Aquarium, or the Oregon Zoo in Portland, but that'll set you back some dead presidents.
What is new in my time is the unbridled fetish of consumption, the pursuit of what in hip-hop parlance is called "bling"--spacious cribs, sparkling jewels, and a roll of dead Presidents.
And dead presidents joins dead air, dead letter, dead metaphor, and dead reckoning, the newbie standing for "U.
The story of the dollar throws up many interesting facts: how Dixieland took its name from a $10 bill favoured in the deep south; why masonic symbols were chosen to adorn dollar bills; and why only the portraits of dead Presidents are used.
Sure, the auto industry had its Henry Ford and Louis Chevrolet and its Dodge brothers, but for every one of them, there were companies named after Indian chiefs, European explorers and dead presidents.
In the process, Master P and company are staking their claim, rewriting the rules and raking in a lot of dead presidents.
Tolerated only when measured by our octave range, athletic prowess, and/or our general public-pleasing abilities," Stanford writes, "men, who, in the light of day, are looked upon in disdain, while in the cloaking darkness of night are desired, hunted, and insulted by dead presidents in exchange for illicit favors.
Think of that receipt as green paper with pictures of dead presidents.