dead marine


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dead marine

verb
See also: dead, marine
References in periodicals archive ?
The Supreme Council for Environment runs a dead marine mammals and turtles monitoring program which aims at establishing a database of recorded dead sightings which is entered following the inspection of the dead mammal or turtle to identify the reason of death.
But it turns out that instead of sucking on fish blood, the vampire squid makes a modest living feeding on bits of dead marine life and other effluvia that floats down to the lower depths of the sea.
They also looked at records of seafloor sediments containing preserved shells of dead marine organisms; the shells contain higher or lower levels of a heavier isotope of oxygen, depending on the relative salinity of surface waters when the organisms were alive (less salty waters indicate more rainfall over the ocean).
The Ministry of Defence did not release any personal details about the dead marine.
He then further risked his life by checking the body of a dead Marine blown from the gun turret.
COSTLY Members of a US environmental service crew walk the shoreline in search of dead marine wildlife
The study, also conducted by the BCSR, revealed that a sharp increase in the number of dead marine turtles coincided with the beginning of the shrimping season, in mid-July.
Researchers led by Moeller, of Hollings Marine Laboratory in Charleston, found a sea sponge thriving in the midst of dead marine creatures.
Where the ocean currents wafted along heated coastline, dead marine iguanas washed ashore, while parboiled invertebrates drifted loose among blanched inter-tidal algae.
The discovery of a dead Marine intelligence officer in a motel room prompts the team to hunt for his killer in an investigation which could lead to a terrorist cell.
The coast guard, using three patrol boats and one helicopter, has begun investigating the accident, searching for a dead marine animal.
The council then disposed of the carcasses, as dead marine mammals can pose a serious health risk.
The symptoms are hard to ignore: dead marine animals washing up on beaches; toxic microbes proliferating along coastlines; fewer fish piling up in nets.
Billions of the terrifying crustaceans live in depths of down to 4,500m in the North Atlantic and hunt in huge shoals to eat the remains of dead marine animals, from whales to seabirds.
Now, Jill Ireland, of Swansea University, who logged the higher than usual seabird death tolls, is investigating the recent sightings of dead marine animals washed up around the Gower peninsula and in Pembrokeshire.