dead man


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Related to dead man: Dead Man Walking

dead man

A man who is certain to die or be killed, often used in or as a threat. You're a dead man if you tell anyone what happened here today!
See also: dead, man

dead man

verb
See also: dead, man
References in classic literature ?
If she had been in doubt before, one glance at the hideous features set in death must have convinced her that life was extinct, and with the realization there broke from her lips peal after peal of mad, maniacal laughter as with her little hands she beat upon the upturned face and breast of the dead man.
But an auction ain't taking anything off a dead man.
They didn't hear Uncle Silas say he would kill Jubiter; they didn't hear no blow struck; they didn't see no dead man, and they didn't see Uncle Silas hide anything in the bushes.
He then put the dead man in a hollow tree at his head--for he wanted to protect him from the wolves--and laid himself down on the ground and moss.
At first the Trojans drove the Achaeans back, and they withdrew from the dead man daunted.
Half hidden by the intervening trees he still could see the huge head and the massive jaws from which protrude the limp legs of the dead man.
In the breast of the leader was the hope that he had planted enough of superstitious terror in their hearts to make the sight of the supposed author of their imagined wrongs sufficient provocation for his murder; for Bududreen was too sly to give the order for the killing of a white man--the arm of the white man's law was too long--but he felt that he would rest easier were he to leave the island with the knowledge that only a dead man remained behind with the secret of his perfidy.
The whole agglomeration of things, the ship steered into port by a dead man, his attitude, tied to the wheel with a crucifix and beads, the touching funeral, the dog, now furious and now in terror, will all afford material for her dreams.
I laugh in great bitterness, and I say, 'You are dead man.
The dead man was still sitting there, too, and in the sunlight now.
The captain broke loose upon the dead man like a thunderclap.
He checked his first impulse to ring the bell, and looked carefully on the table for some note or message from the dead man.
The dead man lay on his back, sprawling with outstretched limbs in the centre of the room.
The object at his feet resolved itself into a dead horse, and at a right angle across the animal's neck lay a dead man, face upward in the moonlight.
The net result to Nalasu was one dead man and no telling how many arrow-pricked wounded men who dragged themselves away.