day off


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*day off

a day free from working. (*Typically: get ~; have ~; give someone ~; take ~.) The next time I get a day off, we'll go to the zoo. I have the day off. Let's go hiking.
See also: off

day off

A day away from work, school, or a similar obligation; a free day. For example, Sophie always used her day off to do errands. [Late 1800s]
See also: off
References in periodicals archive ?
Organizations that Grant a Paid Day off More Likely to Sponsor Commemorative Events
However, if the employee was originally entitled to that day off with pay, the employer must find a way to give the employee the equivalent benefit.
I urge your readers to support CLIC and get together with colleagues to organise Win A Day Off Work.
The beauty of this event is that, due to it being sponsored by Best Western Hotels with the companies taking part donating the prize of a day off, every penny raised will go directly to help support children and their families faced with cancer.
For the rule "If an employee works on the weekend, then that person gets a day off during the week," employees concentrate on the employer's duty following weekend work and their own rights to a day off, whereas employers focus on employees' duty to meet a weekend-work obligation and the bosses' right to deny a day off to those who hadn't done so.
New Year's holiday numbers are different, with 51 percent providing employees a full day off on December 31, and 14 percent, half-day off.
According to a decision issued by the minister, Saturday, November 30 will be a day off for employees at private sector companies who only take a one-day weekend on Friday.
We haven't even been told that we'll be allowed to take an extra day off later on to compensate us for the National Day holiday.
The study revealed that workers who rated their manager as 'good' were more likely to feel bad about taking a day off than those with 'poor' managers.
HARDLINE Hearts boss Paulo Sergio has stripped his players of their midweek day off because he wants them to work harder on their game.
And as for his comment that the extra day off "would cost business millions in lost revenue", I would remind him that when folk are not working they like to spend their money.
CARDIFF council's deputy leader Neil McEvoy is facing criticism for announcing a vague promise to give councilworkers the day off on St David's Day next year.
Supermarket giant Tesco has been accused of meanness by some of its part-time workers who will have to work extra hours or have their pay docked to make up for their day off on Christmas Day.
Frank McKenna, of private sectorconsortium Downtown Liverpool in Business, claimed many Evertonians may have taken the day off t o escape colleagues' jibes.