I dare say

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I dare say

(slightly formal)
I am quite certain Oh, I dare say Caroline and I will find some way to fill the time while you go off shopping.
See also: dare, say

I dare say

1. I venture to assert or affirm, as in I dare say my point of view will be heard. [c. 1300]
2. Also, I daresay. I presume or assume to be likely, as in I daresay you'll be invited. This usage is more common in Britain than in America. [Mid-1700s]
See also: dare, say
References in classic literature ?
You'll excuse me, I dare say, but you remind me of that fable.
I dare say he never did, because I understand that diplomatists, in and out of the career, take themselves and their tricks with an exemplary seriousness.
Some gentlemen have talked of bringing it before Parliament, and I dare say would have done it, only they hadn't time to come to me, and I hadn't power to go to them, and they got tired of my long letters, and dropped the business.
You had better order the carriage directly, my love," said she; "I dare say we shall be able to get along, if we set off directly; and if we do come to any thing very bad, I can get out and walk.
Why, my dear Miss Clare," he returned, "I think they may perhaps understand each other; but you will see them soon, I dare say, and I must learn from you on such a point--not you from me.
She means well, poor soul -- I dare say she means well.
said Miss La Creevy; 'on some kind, charitable business, I dare say.
But he's a very early riser, and I dare say he's in the Library already.
I dare say he never drove anything but oxen in his life.
No, I'm sure I don't, but I dare say I shall be, for I've been with Beth all the time.
Very remarkable, I dare say," she answered, "to people who feel any doubt of this pitiable lady of yours being mad.
And I dare say that he did know, and that you know what he said: please, therefore, to remind me of what he said; or, if you would rather, tell me your own view; for I suspect that you and he think much alike.
I dare say, Athenians, that some one among you will reply, 'Yes, Socrates, but what is the origin of these accusations which are brought against you; there must have been something strange which you have been doing?
What is bad (this is my comment again) is that I dare say people will be thankful for the gold pins then.
Yes, I dare say, sir; but you were not compelled to dance in a room eighteen by twenty-four, with a hundred people treading on your toes, or brushing their heads in your face.