danger


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fly into the face of danger

Fig. to take great risks; to threaten or challenge danger, as if danger were a person. (This may refer to flying, as in an airplane, but not necessarily.) John plans to go bungee jumping this weekend. He really likes flying into the face of danger. Willard was not exactly the type to fly into the face of danger, but tonight was an exception, and he ordered extra-hot enchiladas.
See also: danger, face, fly, of

fraught with danger

Cliché [of something] full of something dangerous or unpleasant. The spy's trip to Russia was fraught with danger. My escape from the kidnapper was fraught with danger.
See also: danger
References in classic literature ?
The perpetual menacings of danger oblige the government to be always prepared to repel it; its armies must be numerous enough for instant defense.
At present I mean only to consider it as it respects security for the preservation of peace and tranquillity, as well as against dangers from FOREIGN ARMS AND INFLUENCE, as from dangers of the LIKE KIND arising from domestic causes.
But is not the fact an alarming proof of the danger resulting from a government which does not possess regular powers commensurate to its objects?
When we came down to drink I knew that no danger lurked near upon this side of the water hole, for else the zebras would have discovered it and fled before we came; but upon the other side toward which the wind blows danger might lie concealed.
As the days wore on, his utter carelessness of any considera- tion so intensified our distress and danger that I had, much as I loathed doing it, to resort to threats, and at last to blows.
No toil, no danger, no privation can turn the trapper from his pursuit.
So long as a single pass up or down the mountain was unexplored, there was hope: but when retreat seemed to be absolutely impracticable, the horror of their situation broke upon Elizabeth as powerfully as if she had hitherto considered the danger light.
Their apprehensions were aggravated by some of Lisa's followers, who, not being engaged in the expedition, took a mischievous pleasure in exaggerating its dangers.
Yet the ear, it fully knows, By the twanging And the clanging, How the danger ebbs and flows; Yet, the ear distinctly tells, In the jangling And the wrangling, How the danger sinks and swells, By the sinking or the swelling in the anger of the bells - Of the bells - Of the bells, bells, bells, bells, Bells, bells, bells - In the clamour and the clangour of the bells!
To that I am pledged; my dear boy, we who are interested are all in the same danger.
And if this poverty and broken estate in the better sort, be joined with a want and necessity in the mean people, the danger is imminent and great.
To ride this horse was a pleasure to him, and he thought of the horse, of the morning, of the doctor's wife, but not once of the impending danger.
His Majesty continued to throw the quoits as coolly as if no danger threatened his throne, but the Pumpkinhead, having caught sight of Tip, ambled toward the boy as fast as his wooden legs would go.
Scarce had the debris settled than the ape-man was among the beasts, quieting their fears, talking to them in low, pacific tones, stroking their shaggy bodies, and assuring them, as only he could, that the immediate danger was over.
He gave me to understand that in that direction was some horrible danger, but just what the horrible danger was his paucity of language would not permit him to say.