dandy

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Related to dandyish: foppish

fine and dandy

Fine; good. The phrase is often used sarcastically. Sure, Saturday afternoon is fine and dandy—see you then. Well, that's just fine and dandy—my car won't start!
See also: and, dandy, fine

fine and dandy

nice; good; well. Well, that's just fine and dandy. Couldn't be better. I feel fine and dandy, and I'm going to have a good time here.
See also: and, dandy, fine

jim-dandy

excellent. This is a jim-dandy knife. Where'd you get it? Tom: I'll meet you at six, OK? Charlie: That'll be jim-dandy.

fine and dandy

All right, excellent, as in What you're proposing is fine and dandy with the rest of us. This redundant colloquialism ( fine and dandy both mean "excellent") today is more often used sarcastically in the sense of "not all right" or "bad," as in You don't want to play bridge? Fine and dandy, you've left me without a partner.
See also: and, dandy, fine

fine and dandy

mod. nice; good; well. (Often sarcastic.) Well, that’s just fine and dandy. Couldn’t be better!
See also: and, dandy, fine
References in periodicals archive ?
Evelyn Waugh, perhaps heeding this example, documents the demise of Sebastian Flyte in Brideshead Revisited, not that of his grotesque, Mephistophelian dandyish outrider, Anthony Blanche.
As Harpagon's flighty, high-strung son Cleante, "the little pisser" who rebels against his father by frivolous expenditures and compulsive gambling, Jeune Lune's Stephen Cartmell effuses delightful, dandyish little twitches, pacing and ranting like a testosterone-charged teen.
At such moments Irving's often-noted literary ticks (irony, comedy, the mild and dandyish amusement of his narrating voices) start to take on an ideological import.
Best known for: His (now shorn) flowing locks, dandyish outfits and love of colourful interior design.
Wearing dirty white in dishevelment as delicate as the falling draperies on a dandyish Renaissance Saint.
If one of the five acquaintances (for they are neither fully nor truly friends) stands out in a crowd, it is Charles Gabor, a sleek, somewhat dandyish Hungarian American (and the only bilingual member of the quintet) who works overseas for a New York venture capital firm while patiently scouting promising investment options, preparing "to make a fortune on the Hot prospect of his choice.
The group came out of the dandyish New Romantic scene in London at the start of the 80s.
Again he is assigning himself a role, here that of the dandyish aesthete who is too disengaged from the world to be practical, again he is talking down his own abilities and qualities.
Parodic, pointedly anachronistic, even dandyish, the device recalls a time when the dandy was the natural province of the leisured aristocrat, but is now one of many modes that the woman and her text may, at will, dress up in.
There is the innocently foolish Lieutenant Wylde Oates, the vain and dandyish Captain Sloperton, the dissipated and aging Colonel Bagot Lee, and short-tempered but soldierly Major Tindall.
Prominent was the rather chic figure of George Shultz, former Secretary of State, who has become almost dandyish and svelte since his second marriage, to a prominent local socialite.
For he had been endlessly caricatured in the British press for his dandyish appearance with his lilies, blue china, and poems called "Impressions.
It was also a long way from the dandyish look of Depp's character in the new Gothic horror film Sleepy Hollow.
For he had foppish ways and as a young man he must have impressed mother with his dandyish airs, his gold watch and tie pin and beringed fingers.
In the foreground, the dandyish young Mexican artist, a friend of Rivera's, adjusts his leather gloves while seeming to spin an enormous Ferris wheel on his fingertip.