cut through


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cut through (something)

1. To slice something. I don't think that knife is sharp enough to cut through the fruit's tough rind.
2. To move across an area, often as a shortcut. I'm sick of all these kids cutting through my yard to get to the school down the street. We'll get there quicker if we cut through the park.
3. To do something in a simple or straightforward way, bypassing a more complex alternative. Can you please cut through all this legalese and tell us exactly what the subpoena is saying?
4. To interrupt something. Luckily, the gym teacher's whistle cut through the din of yelling children.
5. To make a path through something. Our footprints cut a path through the freshly fallen snow.
See also: cut, through

cut through something

to penetrate something by cutting; to slice through something. The worker cut through the steel door with a torch. Walter cut through the rind of the watermelon.
See also: cut, through

cut through

v.
1. To penetrate or slice through something: He cut through the tough steak with a knife.
2. To avoid or bypass something complicated; circumvent something: Lets cut through the red tape and get this matter resolved.
3. To travel across some region, rather than around it: We cut through the field to get to school. The snow isn't deep here; let's cut through.
4. To create a passageway through something by cutting: Someone had cut a path through the woods.
5. To interrupt something: The judge's gavel cut through my objections.
See also: cut, through