cut capers

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cut capers

Also, cut a caper. Frolic or romp, as in The children cut capers in the pile of raked leaves. The noun caper comes from the Latin for "goat," and the allusion is to act in the manner of a young goat clumsily frolicking about. The expression was first recorded in Shakespeare's Twelfth Night (1:3): "Faith, I can cut a caper."
See also: caper, cut
References in classic literature ?
Flimnap, the treasurer, is allowed to cut a caper on the straight rope, at least an inch higher than any other lord in the whole empire.
The Jester looked at each of the four corners of the paper with such a grin of affected intelligence as a monkey is apt to assume upon similar occasions, then cut a caper, and gave the letter to Locksley.
Then he cut a caper, and became so bold that he even tapped at the window; but the bundle never moved.
He may have fallen from his horse, he may have cut a caper from the deck; he may have traveled so fast against the wind as to have brought on a violent catarrh.
Commonly it appears in the verb phrase "cut a caper" as in Pericles: Boult's advertising of the virginal Miranda so excites Monsieur Veroles (whose name derives from verole, the French for "pox") that "He offered to cut a caper at the proclamation" (scene 16.