cut


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cut

(oneself) loose (from someone or something) to get out from under the domination of someone or something. At last, she cut herself loose from her mother. She had to cut loose from home. Everyone wished that Todd would cut himself loose from his mother.

cut

1. mod. alcohol intoxicated. He got cut on beer, which is unusual for him.
2. tv. to dilute something. She always cuts her eggnog with cola. Yuck!
3. n. a share of the loot or the profits. (Originally underworld.) You’ll get your cut when everybody else does.
4. n. a single song or section of music on a record. This next cut is one everybody likes.
5. tv. to eliminate something; to stop (doing something). Okay, chum, cut the clowning.
6. mod. muscular; with well-defined muscles, especially in reference to the abdominal muscles. He works out and he’s really cut!
7. mod. circumcised. (Not usually prenominal.) I’m not cut and neither is my brother.

cut

verb
See cut up

cut

/give (someone) some slack
Slang To make an allowance for (someone), as in allowing more time to finish something.
See:
References in classic literature ?
I used to play with paper dolls myself, an' cut 'em out; but I never thought I'd ever see such things alive.
Yes; I cut them out with my scissors, and paint the faces and some of the costumes.
This is live paper,' she said, 'and all the dolls you cut out of it will be alive, and able to think and to talk.
My days in the woods were not very long ones; yet I usually carried my dinner of bread and butter, and read the newspaper in which it was wrapped, at noon, sitting amid the green pine boughs which I had cut off, and to my bread was imparted some of their fragrance, for my hands were covered with a thick coat of pitch.
And so, if the railroad reached round the world, I think that I should keep ahead of you; and as for seeing the country and getting experience of that kind, I should have to cut your acquaintance altogether.
From the uplands he could get a view of the shaded cut part of the meadow below, with its grayish ridges of cut grass, and the black heaps of coats, taken off by the mowers at the place from which they had started cutting.
He was in front of all, and cut his wide row without bending, as though playing with the scythe.
The grass was short close to the road, and Levin, who had not done any mowing for a long while, and was disconcerted by the eyes fastened upon him, cut badly for the first moments, though he swung his scythe vigorously.
If I was boss I'd cut the wages of any man that listened to them.
But look at Billy," Bert argued "The teamsters ain't ben sayin' a word, not a peep, an' everything lovely, and then, bang, right in the neck, a ten per cent cut.
In a word, I brought away all the sails, first and last; only that I was fain to cut them in pieces, and bring as much at a time as I could, for they were no more useful to be sails, but as mere canvas only.
I soon emptied the hogshead of the bread, and wrapped it up, parcel by parcel, in pieces of the sails, which I cut out; and, in a word, I got all this safe on shore also.
Cutting the great cable into pieces, such as I could move, I got two cables and a hawser on shore, with all the ironwork I could get; and having cut down the spritsail-yard, and the mizzen- yard, and everything I could, to make a large raft, I loaded it with all these heavy goods, and came away.
Has a piece cut out of each ear, and the middle finger of the left hand cut off to the second joint.
Has a cut on the left arm, a scar on the left shoulder, and two upper teeth missing.