curve


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above the curve

Being greater, better, or more advanced than the average in the relative field, especially in research or innovative pursuits. The research being done on leukemia here is far above the curve anywhere else in the world.
See also: above, curve

ahead of the curve

1. Better than average. I'm not sure how I did on that exam, but I think I'll end up ahead of the curve.
2. At the forefront of or leading in something, such as a developing situation, field of study or business, social development, etc. The new professor is way ahead of the curve with his research into genetics.
See also: ahead, curve, of

behind the curve

Not up to date or current in some area. Often said of politicians. Can you believe he made that sexist remark about women in the workplace? Wow, he's really behind the curve!
See also: behind, curve

a curve ball

1. In baseball, a ball that curves in its trajectory toward home plate. He's a good batter, but he has a hard time hitting a curve ball.
2. An unexpected occurrence or thing. I thought I had confirmed my hypothesis, so these results are a real curve ball.
3. A deceptive action or thing. I don't know, I think her sudden displays of affection are just a curve ball to get me to trust her.
See also: ball, curve

curve to

To bend in a particular direction. I swung the bat but missed because the ball curved to the left at the last second.
See also: curve

curve to something

to bend or bow toward something, some direction, or some place. The road curved to the left. One of her toes curves to the right.
See also: curve

pitch someone a curve(ball)

Fig. to surprise someone with an unexpected act or event. (Referring to a curve-ball in baseball. It is the route of the ball that is curved, not the ball itself. See also throw someone a curve(ball).) You really pitched me a curveball when you said I had done a poor job. I did my best. You asked Tom a trick question. You certainly pitched him a curve.
See also: curve, pitch

throw someone a curve

 
1. Lit. to pitch a curveball to someone in baseball. (See pitch someone a curve(ball).) The pitcher threw John a curve, and John swung wildly against thin air. During that game, the pitcher threw everyone a curve at least once.
2. Fig. to confuse someone by doing something tricky or unexpected. When you said "house" you threw me a curve. The password was supposed to be "home." John threw me a curve when we were making our presentation, and I forgot my speech.
See also: curve, throw

throw a curve

Surprise or outwit someone, as in They threw me a curve when they said that our department would be combined with yours. This colloquial term comes from baseball, where a pitcher tries to fool the batter by using a curve ball, which is thrown with sufficient spin to make it veer from its expected path. The term was transferred to other kinds of surprise, not necessarily unpleasant, in the mid-1900s.
See also: curve, throw

throw someone a curve

or

throw someone a curve ball

mainly AMERICAN
If someone throws you a curve or if they throw you a curve ball, they surprise you by doing something unexpected, sometimes causing you trouble. Just when they thought they might have the boss figured out, Knight would throw them a curve. Every so often Mother Nature throws us a curve ball. Note: You can refer to unexpected problems as curve balls. Once you get to know a person's habits and idiosyncrasies, there are fewer curve balls. Note: In baseball, a `curve ball' is a ball that curves through the air rather than travelling in a straight line.
See also: curve, throw

behind (or ahead of) the curve

behind (or in advance of) the current trend.
The expression is probably based on the notion of the curve of a graph.
2005 Stylus Magazine Everyone knows the cultural stereotype – the Japanese are hopelessly, adorably behind the curve when it comes to Western music styles.
See also: behind, curve

throw a curve

cause confusion or consternation by acting unexpectedly. US informal
Curve is short for curve ball , a term in baseball for a delivery in which the pitcher causes the ball to deviate from a straight path by imparting spin.
See also: curve, throw

ahead of/behind the ˈcurve

(especially American English, business) in advance of or behind a particular trend: Our expert advice will help you stay ahead of the curve.We’ve fallen behind the curve when it comes to using the Internet.
See also: ahead, behind, curve, of
References in periodicals archive ?
This causes the first-temperature-up curve to tend to have a slope, even though it is expected to be the baseline with hysteresis.
Perhaps, but their work already has scored points in the long-standing debate about the role of baseball seams in curve balls.
They don't engulf the Curve but I have to practice how I grip the gun for maximum purchase.
While we can use the yield curve to predict whether future GDP growth will be above or below average, it does not do so well in predicting an actual number, especially in the case of recessions.
Munteanu [5] showed that they can be constructed by using an arbitrary curve on the sphere S2 or an equiangular spiral.
giving a slope in width superelevation to the curve has specific limits which causes other disadvantages when exceeded.
Included were warning signs (for example, curve ahead or suggested speed limit) and curve delineation signs (chevrons or horizontal arrows).
In open bends such as left-hand curves, and when leaving curves, drivers spent a third of their time looking at the end of the curve and the straight road that comes after.
If Learning Curve was required under its licensing agreement with HIT to protect HIT's intellectual-property rights in connection with its retention of Schrock's photography services, it apparently failed to do so," Judge Diane Sykes wrote.
Whenever I hear about a thrower who has a curve ball (or any other breaking pitch), I will discover that the pitch is actually a fastball that goes inside, outside, up, or down
Consequently, the sizes of the amplicons and percentage guanine-cytosine content were different, allowing discrimination between HPAI and LPAI by melting curve analysis (7).
of the elongation to break data yields a master curve (figure 9) with shifted aging time at 80[degrees]C on the abscissa.
What if a stylist wants that curve to invoke the feeling of acceleration or tension, sharpness or softness?
It looks as if the Fed is still using a traditional Phillips curve tradeoff between falling unemployment and rising inflation.