curry

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Related to currying: currying favor

give (someone) (a bit of) curry

To berate, rebuke, or criticize (someone); to verbally or physically harass or assault (someone). A reference to the spiciness of curry, that is, making it "hot" for someone. Primarily heard in Australia. Protesters gave the defendant a bit of curry as he left the courtroom in the evening. Don't be afraid to give curry back when you are being pushed around. The wife gave me curry when I showed up late.
See also: bit, curry, give

curry favor with someone

to try to win favor from someone. The lawyer tried to curry favor with the judge. It's silly to curry favor with the boss. Just act yourself.
See also: curry, favor

curry favor (with somebody)

to try to make someone like you or support you by doing or saying things to please them The candidate has promised lower taxes in an attempt to curry favor with the voters.
See also: curry, favor

curry favour

to try to make someone like you or support you by doing things to please them (usually + with ) The government has promised lower taxes in an attempt to curry favour with the voters.
See also: curry, favour

curry favor

Seek gain or advancement by fawning or flattery, as in Edith was famous for currying favor with her teachers. This expression originally came from the Old French estriller fauvel, "curry the fallow horse," a beast that in a 14th-century allegory stood for duplicity and cunning. It came into English about 1400 as curry favel-that is, curry (groom with a currycomb) the animal-and in the 1500s became the present term.
See also: curry, favor

curry favor

To seek or gain favor by fawning or flattery.
See also: curry, favor

curry favor

To ingratiate oneself through flattery or a willingness to please. “Curry” has nothing to do with the spice—it means to groom, as in the horse-keeping currycomb tool. One of the definitions of “stroke” is “suck up to,” and the image is similar—to get on a person's good side, whether or not flattery is warranted. “Favor” was originally “Fauvel,” the donkey who was the rogue hero of a 14th-century French romance. The image of grooming the beast to get on its good side or to win its favor is now the modern use of the word in the phrase.
See also: curry, favor