curry favour


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Related to curry favour: curry favor

curry favor

To ingratiate oneself to someone Flattery won't work; the only way of currying favor with him is through hard work.
See also: curry, favor

curry favor

Seek gain or advancement by fawning or flattery, as in Edith was famous for currying favor with her teachers. This expression originally came from the Old French estriller fauvel, "curry the fallow horse," a beast that in a 14th-century allegory stood for duplicity and cunning. It came into English about 1400 as curry favel-that is, curry (groom with a currycomb) the animal-and in the 1500s became the present term.
See also: curry, favor

curry favour

ingratiate yourself with someone through obsequious behaviour.
Curry here means ‘groom a horse or other animal’ with a coarse brush or comb. The phrase is an early 16th-century alteration of the Middle English curry favel , Favel (or Fauvel ) being the name of a chestnut horse in an early 14th-century French romance who epitomized cunning and duplicity. From this ‘to groom Favel’ came to mean to use on him the cunning which he personified. It is unclear whether the bad reputation of chestnut horses existed before the French romance, but the idea is also found in 15th-century German in the phrase den fahlen hengst reiten (ride the chestnut horse) meaning ‘behave deceitfully’.
See also: curry, favour

curry ˈfavour (with somebody)

(British English) (American English curry ˈfavor (with somebody)) (disapproving) try to get somebody to like or support you by praising or helping them a lot: They have lowered taxes in an attempt to curry favour with the voters. Curry in this phrase means to groom (= clean and comb) a horse. The phrase was originally ‘curry favel’ (= a light brown horse that was thought to be clever and dishonest) and came to mean to try to please somebody who might be useful to you, especially by doing or saying things that you do not mean or believe.
See also: curry, favour

curry favor

To seek or gain favor by fawning or flattery.
See also: curry, favor

curry favor

To ingratiate oneself through flattery or a willingness to please. “Curry” has nothing to do with the spice—it means to groom, as in the horse-keeping currycomb tool. One of the definitions of “stroke” is “suck up to,” and the image is similar—to get on a person's good side, whether or not flattery is warranted. “Favor” was originally “Fauvel,” the donkey who was the rogue hero of a 14th-century French romance. The image of grooming the beast to get on its good side or to win its favor is now the modern use of the word in the phrase.
See also: curry, favor
References in periodicals archive ?
Alfonso, within days of Grant's public discussion of Alfonso's economy with the truth, forgot the bad Canada Lands people who were trying to curry favour with him and told anyone who cared to listen that yes, he did call Grant, the chairman of Canada lands, and suggest this was a valuable man with 25 years experience in land issues, and yes it would be a good idea for them to hire his man.
Instead, they increase their share of domestic jobs to curry favour with their wives or girlfriends, mostly before a major sporting event or in advance of a night out with their mates.
Maybe it's a case of Michel Platini (right) trying to curry favour with as many countries as possible.
In a bid to curry favour with the millions she so spectacularly offended, Jade lands a job as a waitress in an Indian restaurant.
The Bill: In a bid to curry favour with her Sun Hill colleagues, DC Kate Spears agrees to an undercover assignment aimed at catching drugs supremo David Swain - the killer of DS McAllister's lover - but soon finds herself falling for his sinister charms, jeopardising the whole operation.
Already up for eviction from the Celebrity Big Brother House, Big Ron didn't exactly curry favour with his comments on Sunday night.
They suspect Hamas are staging a PR stunt to curry favour after ousting Fatah rivals during days of violence in Gaza.
When they finally dock significant points or throw a big-name club out of a competition, I'll believe they want to eradicate this poison and not just pay lip service to the problem to curry favour with politicians.
30pm) IN an attempt to curry favour with her colleagues, DC Kate Spears (Tanya Emery) volunteers to go undercover to investigate a solicitor believed to be laundering money for Swain.
And his Union Jack strides yesterday were a transparent attempt to curry favour with the locals.
Your dad's girlfriend was trying to curry favour with you but did it in a completely irresponsible way.
Ridsdale, you remember, tried to curry favour by suggesting if he had known of Bowyer's yob-like past he wouldn't have brought him to Leeds.
PRINCE Charles looks like he's trying to curry favour with the locals as he joins them in an impromptu dance.
Dashti Babaker, cousin of murdered Banaz Mahmod, and his friend Amir Abbas, were alleged to have joined the plot to curry favour with community elders.
Among those required for a "casting session" at Tory HQ were Female pensioner - preferably frail; male/female patient (in hospital bed); young woman, preferably a victim of assault; and perhaps to curry favour with gay voters, fruit seller (by a stall).