cue


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(right) on cue

At exactly the most (or least) opportune moment, as if on purpose. We had just been talking about the awful new company initiative when, on cue, the CEO walked into the room. I was complaining to my wife that none of my friends had asked how our recent move when, when one of them sent me a text message about it right on cue.
See also: cue, on

cue in

1. To signal one to begin to do something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "cue" and "in." And then I'll cue in the sopranos for the harmony. Once the director cued me in, I stepped on stage.
2. To give one information that they have missed. A noun or pronoun can be used between "cue" and "in." Don't worry, I was here from the beginning so I'll cue you in on what we talked about.
See also: cue

jump the queue

To go ahead of someone or multiple people who have been waiting before one. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I wanted to shout at the man for jumping the queue, but I was too embarrassed about making a scene. There has been public outrage after it came to light that some people had been jumping the queue for surgery appointments because they had a friend or relative working at the hospital.
See also: jump, queue

take a/(one's) cue from (someone or something)

To model one's actions based on the example or influence of someone or something else. The director definitely took a cue from his favorite film when framing that scene. Take a cue from your kids and learn how to enjoy the little things.
See also: cue, take

cue someone in

 
1. Lit. to give someone a cue; to indicate to someone that the time has come. Now, cue the orchestra director in. All right, cue in the announcer.
2. Fig. to tell someone what is going on. (Almost the same as clue someone in (on something).) I want to know what's going on. Cue me in. Cue in the general about the troop movement.
See also: cue

take one's cue from someone

to use someone else's behavior or reactions as a guide to one's own. (From the theatrical cue as a signal to speak, etc.) If you don't know which spoons to use at the dinner, just take your cue from John. The other children took their cue from Tommy and ignored the new boy.
See also: cue, take

cue in

Give information or instructions, for example, She said she'd cue us in on their summer plans. This verbal use of the noun cue in the sense of "guiding suggestion" dates from the 1920s.
See also: cue

take one's cue from

Follow the lead of another, as in I'm not sure what to bring, so I'll take my cue from you. This expression, first recorded in 1622, alludes to the cue giving an actor a signal to speak.
See also: cue, take

take your cue from someone

COMMON If you take your cue from someone, you behave in the same way as them. Taking his cue from his companion, he apologized for his earlier display of temper. Everybody working for you will take their cue from you.
See also: cue, someone, take

on cue

at the correct moment.
See also: cue, on

take your cue from

follow the example or advice of.
Cue in both of these idioms is used in the theatrical sense of ‘the word or words that signal when another actor should speak or perform a particular action’.
See also: cue, take

jump the queue

1 push into a queue of people in order to be served or dealt with before your turn. 2 take unfair precedence over others.
The US version of this expression is jump in line .
See also: jump, queue

(right) on ˈcue

just at the appropriate moment: The bell sounded for the beginning of the lesson, and, right on cue, the teacher walked in.
See also: cue, on

take your ˈcue from somebody

be influenced in your actions by what somebody else has done: In designing the car, we took our cue from other designers who aimed to combine low cost with low petrol consumption.
See also: cue, somebody, take

jump the ˈqueue

(British English) (American English jump the ˈline, cut in ˈline) go to the front of a line of people without waiting for your turn: I get very angry with people who jump the queue. ▶ ˈqueue-jumping (British English) (American English ˈline-jumping less frequent) noun: This practice encourages queue-jumping for medical services.
See also: jump, queue

cue in

v.
1. To give a signal to someone at a specified time, especially a signal to begin: The conductor cued in each section of the choir one by one. Cue me in when it's time to say my lines.
2. To give information or instructions to someone, such as a latecomer: I cued in my coworker about the items that we discussed at the beginning of the meeting. She cued me in to what happened in the first five minutes of the movie.
See also: cue

cue up

v.
1. To position an audio or video recording in readiness for playing: The DJ cued up the next record on the turntable as the song came to an end. I wanted to show scenes from the film during my presentation, so I cued them up ahead of time.
2. To form or get into a waiting line; queue up: The customers cued up for tickets long before the box office was open.
See also: cue, up
References in periodicals archive ?
2001; Krippner, Wickramasekera, Wickramasekera, & Winstead, 1998); and (3) our contention that experiencing an altered state of awareness during exposure to an alcohol cue should increase positive urge to drink.
The different cue sizes (local, medium, and global) were distributed (counterbalanced) across five cueing locations: the left forward, the space between left and central offensive player, the central (ball possessing) offensive forward, the space between the central offensive player and the right forward, and the right forward.
Samsung CUE has thousands of ringtones for consumers to choose from, allowing users to easily browse through popular ringtones and purchase the ones that reflect their style.
Having trained almost 1000 admins in only two years, the CUE Rock Star Admin Hero's Journey is all about providing new, hands-on skills for administrators who desire to create a positive, disruptive process of change in their organizations.
Despite three previous failures, Tizzard remains adamant Cue Card can show his best at Kempton.
After the dog is successful a few times, use the cue before the dog performs the behavior.
location) related to the response sequence in addition to the red-light cues during the Guiding-Cues condition.
In Experiment 2, we attempted to confirm whether the gaze cue used in Experiment 1 actually directed observers' attention to the gazing location.
In the first two experiments, we aimed at investigating whether presenting a second cue at fixation (after the peripheral cue) would lead to IOR in a situation in which facilitation is otherwise observed.
The moderating role of cue ambiguity was investigated by Webb and Sheeran (2004).
Cue To Cue nearly upset the long odds-on Peddlers Cross at Musselburgh on her most recent start and is another good mare out of Marello, who won many big races for Reveley's mother, Mary.
In contrast, Cue Card has registered four consecutive career-high RPRs and this promising and improving chaser could find further progress now stepped up to 3m for the first time.
Using a robot named Nexi, Northeastern University psychology professor David DeSteno and collaborators Cynthia Breazeal from MIT's Media Lab and Robert Frank and David Pizarro from Cornell University have figured out the answer - observing a person's non-verbal cues.
Sydney, Australia, June 18, 2012 - (ABN Newswire) - Cue Energy Resources Limited (ASX:CUE) is an oil and gas exploration and production company with a regional focus on SE Asia and Australasia.
We also found that a significant number of oyster drills would continue to move upstream even if cue delivery was stopped midway through the trial.