crystals


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crystals

n. the testicles. (From crystal balls.) He got hit right in the crystals. It was real embarrassing, as well as painful.
See also: crystal
References in classic literature ?
Pillars of hard, gray ice supported the high, arched roof, hung with crystal icicles.
Ice confined beneath the earth for a thousand years is transformed into rock crystals.
The head hunters had been engaged in collecting camphor crystals when their quick ears caught the noisy passage of the six while yet at a considerable distance, and with ready parangs the savages crept stealthily toward the sound of the advancing party.
Their breath froze in the air as it left their mouths, spouting forth in spumes of vapour that settled upon the hair of their bodies and formed into crystals of frost.
Eyelashes and cheeks and lips were so coated with the crystals from their frozen breath that their faces were not discernible.
Because you cannot without affirming what you wish to deny, namely, intelligent cooperation among the constituent elements of the crystals.
A bright fire was glowing in the old-fashioned Waterloo stove and blue-white frost crystals were shining on the windowpanes.
The border of this lake is formed of mud: and in this numerous large crystals of gypsum, some of which are three inches long, lie embedded; whilst on the surface others of sulphate of soda lie scattered about.
White Pond and Walden are great crystals on the surface of the earth, Lakes of Light.
The harlequin, already clad in silver paper out of cigar boxes, was, with difficulty, prevented from smashing the old Victorian lustre chandeliers, that he might cover himself with resplendent crystals.
This solution deposits in a few hours the greater part of the strychnine salt as an insoluble bromide in transparent crystals.
Along the walls were cabinets, plain or glass-fronted, through which were visible microscopes, special photographic apparatus, and a large quantity of crystals.
They are produced by refraction of light from mineral and ice crystals, from mist, rain, spray, and no end of things; and I am afraid they are the penalty I must pay for transparency.
As he spoke, he threw into the vessel a few white crystals, and then added some drops of a transparent fluid.
There was no trace then of the horror which I had myself felt at this curt declaration; but his face showed rather the quiet and interested composure of the chemist who sees the crystals falling into position from his oversaturated solution.