cry for


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cry for someone or something

 
1. to weep for the absence or loss of someone or something. No need to cry for me. Take care of yourself. She cried for her lost cat.
2. to shout a demand for someone or something. She cried for help, but no one heard her. Tony cried for Walter, but he did not hear.
3. to cry or bawl, signaling the need or want for someone or something. (As done by a baby.) The baby cried for a bottle. Little Jimmy was crying for his mother.
See also: cry

cry for

Also, cry out for; have a crying need for. Be in urgent need of, as in This wall cries for a second coat of paint, or This car is crying out for a good washing, or There is a crying need for order in this house. The figurative use of cry for, literally meaning "implore" or "weep for," dates from the late 1500s, as does the use of crying for "demanding attention." The first variant, alluding to actually shouting out one's needs or desires, dates from the second half of the 1800s.
See also: cry
References in periodicals archive ?
There's a world of difference between letting your baby cry for five minutes to see if they'll settle and letting them get really distressed.
Most experts agree that how long you let your baby cry for is a matter of common sense.
NEWBORNS: Very young babies cry for food, so feed them before they wake up crying, says Chireal Shallow, founder of Naturally Nurturing.
Did rock too hard, though, a couple of times and got a very shrill cry for rough handling.
All of us responsible members of society cry for children who have been cheated out of having fathers.
Babies cry for a variety of reasons, including hunger and thirst, being hot or cold, wanting attention, tiredness, discomfort and pain.
IF you don't respond, he'll cry for longer, continuing until he gets the attention that he needs.
Often crying occurs in the late afternoon or early evening, when your baby may cry for as long as half an hour.