crow

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crow over (something)

To brag or boast about something, likened to the squawking of a rooster. You know, no one likes it when you go around crowing over your successes in business.
See also: crow

crow's feet

Wrinkles at the corner of the eyes, likened to the long forked toes on a crow's foot. Some people dread getting wrinkles, but I rather like my crow's feet—I think they give me a wise appearance.
See also: feet

be up with the crows

To be awake, out of bed, and active at a particularly early hour of the morning. Primarily heard in Australia. I don't know how he does it, but my husband is up with the crows every single morning. I won't have another pint, thanks. I have to be up with the crows tomorrow, so I'd better head home soon.
See also: crow, up

up with the crows

Awake, out of bed, and active at a particularly early hour of the morning. Primarily heard in Australia. I don't know how he does it, but my husband has gotten up with the crows every morning of his life. I won't have another pint, thanks. I have to be up with the crows tomorrow, so I'd better head home soon.
See also: crow, up

a crow to pluck

An issue to discuss—typically one that is a source of annoyance for the speaker. Hey, I have a crow to pluck with you! Why didn't you put gas in my car after you borrowed it?
See also: crow, pluck

crow about something

 and crow over something 
1. Lit. [for a rooster] to cry out or squawk about something. The rooster was crowing about something—you never know what.
2. Fig. [for someone] to brag about something. Stop crowing about your successes! She is crowing over her new car.
See also: crow

crow bait

Rur. someone or an animal that is likely to die; a useless animal or person. That old dog used to hunt good, but now he's just crow bait.
See also: bait, crow

eat crow

 
1. . Fig. to display total humility, especially when shown to be wrong. Well, it looks like I was wrong, and I'm going to have to eat crow. I'll be eating crow if I'm not shown to be right.
2. Fig. to be shamed; to admit that one was wrong. When it became clear that they had arrested the wrong person, the police had to eat crow. Mary talked to Joe as if he was an uneducated idiot, till she found out he was a college professor. That made her eat crow.
See also: crow, eat

eat humble pie

to act very humble when one is shown to be wrong. I think I'm right, but if I'm wrong, I'll eat humble pie. You think you're so smart. I hope you have to eat humble pie.
See also: eat, humble, pie

*hoarse as a crow

very hoarse. (*Also: as ~.) After shouting at the team all afternoon, the coach was as hoarse as a crow. Jill: Has Bob got a cold? Jane: No, he's always hoarse as a crow.
See also: crow

make someone eat crow

Fig. to cause someone to retract a statement or admit an error. Because Mary was completely wrong, we made her eat crow. They won't make me eat crow. They can't prove I was wrong.
See also: crow, eat, make

as the crow flies

measured in a straight line It's only about 100 miles as the crow flies to great ski country.
See also: crow, flies

eat crow

to publicly admit you were wrong about something Charles had to eat crow and tell them they were right all along.
See also: crow, eat

as the crow flies

if the distance between two places is measured as the crow flies, it is measured as a straight line between the two places 'How far is it from Cambridge to London?' 'About 50 miles as the crow flies.' Our farm is only five miles from town as the crow flies, but the winding roads mean we have to drive nearly eight miles to get there.
See eat humble pie
See also: crow, flies

eat humble pie

  (British, American & Australian) also eat crow (American)
to be forced to admit that you are wrong and to say you are sorry The producers of the advert had to eat humble pie and apologize for misrepresenting the facts.
See also: eat, humble, pie

Jim Crow

  (American)
a situation that existed until the 1960's in the south of the US, when black people were treated badly, especially by being separated from white people in public places
Usage notes: Jim Crow was the name of a black character in a 19th century song and dance act.
Jim Crow meant there were no black kids in white schools. (American)
See also: crow, Jim

Stone the crows!

  (British & Australian informal, old-fashioned)
something that you say in order to show that you are very surprised So she's a film director now. Well, stone the crows!
See leave no stone unturned, sink like a stone
See also: stone

be up with the lark

  (British, American & Australian) also be up with the crows (Australian)
to be awake and out of your bed early in the morning
Usage notes: Larks and crows are birds that start singing very early in the morning.
You were up with the lark this morning!
See also: lark, up

as the crow flies

In a straight line, by the shortest route, as in It's only a mile as the crow flies, but about three miles by this mountain road. This idiom is based on the fact that crows, very intelligent birds, fly straight to the nearest food supply. [Late 1700s]
See also: crow, flies

crow over

Exult loudly about, especially over someone's defeat. For example, In most sports it's considered bad manners to crow over your opponent. This term alludes to the cock's loud crow. [Late 1500s]
See also: crow

eat crow

Also, eat dirt or humble pie . Be forced to admit a humiliating mistake, as in When the reporter got the facts all wrong, his editor made him eat crow. The first term's origin has been lost, although a story relates that it involved a War of 1812 encounter in which a British officer made an American soldier eat part of a crow he had shot in British territory. Whether or not it is true, the fact remains that crow meat tastes terrible. The two variants originated in Britain. Dirt obviously tastes bad. And humble pie alludes to a pie made from umbles, a deer's undesirable innards (heart, liver, entrails). [Early 1800s] Also see eat one's words.
See also: crow, eat

eat crow

tv. to display total humility, especially when shown to be wrong. Well, it looks like I was wrong, and I’m going to have to eat crow.
See also: crow, eat

as the crow flies

In a straight line.
See also: crow, flies

eat crow

To be forced to accept a humiliating defeat.
See also: crow, eat

eat humble pie

To be forced to apologize abjectly or admit one's faults in humiliating circumstances.
See also: eat, humble, pie
References in periodicals archive ?
The Crow Dispersal Program is a vital part of the maintenance and safety of the Capitol Complex," Secretary Curt Topper noted.
Each year Dave Pooler and his gamekeeping team at the Rhug estate, Corwen, will trap and shoot an average of 800 carrion crows.
Dr Khan said he first spotted a pair of crows roosting at Maktoum Bridge in Dubai in 1991.
The Army requirements for its CROWS program include three general SOW (Statement of Work) areas:
Very early morning, when crows leave their roosts to feed, is the best time to intercept them.
Our observations of the capture of a bat on the wing may not seem surprising, given the varied diet and feeding strategies of crows.
The only way to ensure nothing gets left out when the CROWS goes from one unit to another is for both the giving and receiving units to inventory the CROWS with TM 9-1090-218-HR.
CROWS is a stabilized gunner-operated weapon system, which allows the gunner to engage targets from inside a moving vehicle.
Crow deaths as a sentinel surveillance system for West Nile virus in the northeastern United States, 1999.
Crows and ravens are particularly susceptible to the virus.
Two crows hand raised without seeing twig use spontaneously started using sticks to poke food out of crevices, says Benjamin Kenward of the University of Oxford in England.
Dem urchin's what sing my song / Had better mind dar books / For any how dey can't be Crows / You see d'ar only Rooks" (i.
Crows are some of the most commonly seen birds in the cities of Japan.
The removals are a response to a rise in the number of incidents in which people have been attacked by crows during their breeding season, Tokyo officials said.