crow

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crow over (something)

To brag or boast about something, likened to the squawking of a rooster. You know, no one likes it when you go around crowing over your successes in business.
See also: crow, over

crow's feet

Wrinkles at the corner of the eyes, likened to the long forked toes on a crow's foot. Some people dread getting wrinkles, but I rather like my crow's feet—I think they give me a wise appearance.
See also: feet

be up with the crows

To be awake, out of bed, and active at a particularly early hour of the morning. Primarily heard in Australia. I don't know how he does it, but my husband is up with the crows every single morning. I won't have another pint, thanks. I have to be up with the crows tomorrow, so I'd better head home soon.
See also: crow, up

up with the crows

Awake, out of bed, and active at a particularly early hour of the morning. Primarily heard in Australia. I don't know how he does it, but my husband has gotten up with the crows every morning of his life. I won't have another pint, thanks. I have to be up with the crows tomorrow, so I'd better head home soon.
See also: crow, up

a crow to pluck

An issue to discuss—typically one that is a source of annoyance for the speaker. Hey, I have a crow to pluck with you! Why didn't you put gas in my car after you borrowed it?
See also: crow, pluck

as the crow flies

The measurement of distance in a straight line. (From the notion that crows always fly in a straight line.) From here to the office, it's about 20 miles as the crow flies, but it's more like 30 miles by car since you have to wind around the mountain.
See also: crow, flies

crow about (something)

1. Literally, to squawk, as of a rooster. What is that rooster crowing about now? It's not even daylight yet!
2. By extension, to brag or boast about something. You know, no one likes it when you go around crowing about your successes in business.
See also: crow

crow bait

Someone or something that is near death, often an animal. That old horse can barely walk around the farm these days—he's just crow bait now.
See also: bait, crow

eat crow

To admit that one is wrong, usually when doing so triggers great embarrassment or shame. Ugh, now that my idea has failed, I'll have to eat crow in the board meeting tomorrow. I think Ellen is a perfectionist because the thought of having to eat crow terrifies her.
See also: crow, eat

Jim Crow

The period in the southern United States, from the end of the American Civil War until the 1960s, in which African Americans were treated as a lower class of citizens than white people. Though there are still race-related issues today, back during Jim Crow, a black person couldn't even use the same drinking fountain as a white person!
See also: crow, Jim

stone the crows

An exclamation of surprise. Well, stone the crows! I never thought I'd see him walk through those doors again.
See also: crow, stone

crow about something

 and crow over something 
1. Lit. [for a rooster] to cry out or squawk about something. The rooster was crowing about something—you never know what.
2. Fig. [for someone] to brag about something. Stop crowing about your successes! She is crowing over her new car.
See also: crow

crow bait

Rur. someone or an animal that is likely to die; a useless animal or person. That old dog used to hunt good, but now he's just crow bait.
See also: bait, crow

eat crow

 
1. . Fig. to display total humility, especially when shown to be wrong. Well, it looks like I was wrong, and I'm going to have to eat crow. I'll be eating crow if I'm not shown to be right.
2. Fig. to be shamed; to admit that one was wrong. When it became clear that they had arrested the wrong person, the police had to eat crow. Mary talked to Joe as if he was an uneducated idiot, till she found out he was a college professor. That made her eat crow.
See also: crow, eat

*hoarse as a crow

very hoarse. (*Also: as ~.) After shouting at the team all afternoon, the coach was as hoarse as a crow. Jill: Has Bob got a cold? Jane: No, he's always hoarse as a crow.
See also: crow

make someone eat crow

Fig. to cause someone to retract a statement or admit an error. Because Mary was completely wrong, we made her eat crow. They won't make me eat crow. They can't prove I was wrong.
See also: crow, eat, make

as the crow flies

In a straight line, by the shortest route, as in It's only a mile as the crow flies, but about three miles by this mountain road. This idiom is based on the fact that crows, very intelligent birds, fly straight to the nearest food supply. [Late 1700s]
See also: crow, flies

crow over

Exult loudly about, especially over someone's defeat. For example, In most sports it's considered bad manners to crow over your opponent. This term alludes to the cock's loud crow. [Late 1500s]
See also: crow, over

eat crow

Also, eat dirt or humble pie . Be forced to admit a humiliating mistake, as in When the reporter got the facts all wrong, his editor made him eat crow. The first term's origin has been lost, although a story relates that it involved a War of 1812 encounter in which a British officer made an American soldier eat part of a crow he had shot in British territory. Whether or not it is true, the fact remains that crow meat tastes terrible. The two variants originated in Britain. Dirt obviously tastes bad. And humble pie alludes to a pie made from umbles, a deer's undesirable innards (heart, liver, entrails). [Early 1800s] Also see eat one's words.
See also: crow, eat

as the crow flies

If one place is a particular distance from another as the crow flies, the two places are that distance apart if you measure them in a straight line. I live at Mesa, Washington, about 10 miles as the crow flies from Hanford. This mountainous area has always been remote, although it is not far from Tehran as the crow flies. Note: People used to think that crows always travelled to their destination by the most direct route possible. `Make a beeline' is based on a similar idea.
See also: crow, flies

eat crow

AMERICAN
If someone eats crow, they admit that they have been wrong and apologize. He wanted to make his critics eat crow. I didn't want to eat crow the rest of my life if my theories were wrong. Note: The usual British expression is eat humble pie.
See also: crow, eat

as the crow flies

used to refer to a shorter distance in a straight line across country rather than the distance as measured along a more circuitous road.
See also: crow, flies

eat crow

be humiliated by your defeats or mistakes. North American informal
In the USA ‘boiled crow’ has been a metaphor for something extremely disagreeable since the late 19th century.
See also: crow, eat

as the ˈcrow flies

(informal) (of a distance) measured in a straight line: From here to the village it’s five miles as the crow flies, but it’s a lot further by road.
See also: crow, flies

ˌstone the ˈcrows

,

ˌstone ˈme

(old-fashioned, British English) used to express surprise, shock, anger, etc: Stone the crows! You’re not going out dressed like that, are you?
See also: crow, stone

eat crow

tv. to display total humility, especially when shown to be wrong. Well, it looks like I was wrong, and I’m going to have to eat crow.
See also: crow, eat

as the crow flies

In a straight line.
See also: crow, flies

eat crow

To be forced to accept a humiliating defeat.
See also: crow, eat
References in periodicals archive ?
Roosters kept on the 12 hours of light, 12 hours of dim light cycle crowed about 2 hours before lights came on.
Shimmura and Yoshimura also saw that roosters crowed immediately after lights turned on.