cross the aisle

cross the aisle

1. Of politicians, to unite or cooperate—especially through voting—with an opposing political party or members thereof, so as to achieve some political goal or purpose. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. With just enough Republicans crossing the aisle, the Democrats were able to pass the bill through both the Senate and the House of Representatives. If reform of any kind is going to come about in this lifetime, it will take some strong-willed individuals willing to cross the aisle.
2. Of parliamentary members, to leave one's current political party and join another, such that one's legislative seat is physically moved to the new party's location in parliament. Primarily heard in UK, Australia, Canada, New Zealand. Following the prime minister's controversial tax bill, several members of his party crossed the aisle to the Labour Party.
See also: aisle, cross
References in periodicals archive ?
But the driver involved explained although he had seen Mr Borek at the side of the aisle he thought it was safe to proceed and had looked down for a second at his watch to check the time and did not see him begin to cross the aisle.
Now senior Senator Manchin has already shown his willingness to cross the aisle for the greater good.
Republicans are told to cross the aisle to get something done.
At least two Republicans would have to cross the aisle in each chamber for the tax increases to move forward.
If you want to construct something and rebuild you are going to have to cross the aisle.
The nationwide call builds on the momentum of No Labels' successful campaign for bipartisan seating at the State of the Union, with 196 members agreeing to cross the aisle and sit with a member of the opposite party.
In Iowa, Democrats and independents can cross the aisle to participate - a boon to a candidate like Paul, who has hefty support outside the Republican Party, or to Romney, who's considered the most moderate of the front-runners.
Brown was one of eight GOP senators to cross the aisle and vote for repeal of the 1993 DADT law, officially consigned to the history books September 20.
When hunting for beauty and fashion basics, Target customers aren't quick to cross the aisle for international designer goods, Simard said, but they will mix and match mid-range ones.
The majority party still has several opportunities before the August recess to woo some Republicans to cross the aisle and pass the legislation.
It is possible that some of the more influential MP\'s who earlier supported the President, might cross the aisle.
All three main presidential candidates, Senators Clinton, McCain, and Obama (in alphabetical order) had at some point been counted out for being too young or too willing to cross the aisle to seek compromise, or for being a woman, an African American, or a Vietnam veteran and former POW, and the list of reasons and naysayers goes on and on yet, these three individuals are still in the race.
Smyth acknowledged he will be in the minority in the Legislature if elected, and says he would cross the aisle when compromise is needed.
That's because shoppers cross the aisle from the grocery to the general merchandise department.
Maybe Al Gore will threaten to cross the aisle and infect the opposing faction with a nasty case of Dutch Elm disease.