criticism


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Related to criticism: literary criticism, Constructive criticism

barrage of criticism

A large amount of criticism, condemnation, or reproach. The congressman faced a barrage of criticism for his remarks this morning.
See also: criticism, of

open oneself to criticism

to do something that makes one vulnerable to criticism. By saying something so stupid in public, you really opened yourself to criticism.
See also: criticism, open

open to criticism

vulnerable to criticism. Anything the president does is open to criticism.
See also: criticism, open
References in classic literature ?
In countries like France, where the peasants constitute far more than half of the population, it was natural that writers who sided with the proletariat against the bourgeoisie, should use, in their criticism of the bourgeois regime, the standard of the peasant and petty bourgeois, and from the standpoint of these intermediate classes should take up the cudgels for the working class.
Pierre; or, the Ambiguities' (1852) was published, and there ensued a long series of hostile criticisms, ending with a severe, though impartial, article by Fitz-James O'Brien in Putnam's Monthly.
It happened, likewise, that old Peter Hovenden was a guest this evening at his daughter's fireside, and it was his well-remembered expression of keen, cold criticism that first encountered the artist's glance.
Even in 1844, when his literary reputation was established securely, he wrote to a friend expressing his pleasure because a magazine to which he was to contribute had agreed to pay him $20 monthly for two pages of criticism.
A restless, prying, conscientious criticism broke out in unexpected quarters.
His enthusiasm was sincere and his criticism acute.
Criticism is purely destructive; anyone can destroy, but not everyone can build up.
I have found that there is a large element in the South that is quick to respond to straightforward, honest criticism of any wrong policy.
This suffering was the harder to bear because it seemed like a betrayal: the young creature who had worshipped him with perfect trust had quickly turned into the critical wife; and early instances of criticism and resentment had made an impression which no tenderness and submission afterwards could remove.
They deal, to be sure, with the office of Criticism and the art of Fiction, and so far their present name is not a misnomer.
He was [29] meant--we see it in the variety, the high level both of matter and style, the animation, the gravity, of one after another of these thoughts--on religion, on poetry, on politics in the highest sense; on their most abstract principles, and on the authors who have given them a personal colour; on the genius of those authors, as well as on their concrete works; on outlying isolated subjects, such as music, and special musical composers--he was meant, if people ever are meant for special lines of activity, for the best sort of criticism, the imaginative criticism; that criticism which is itself a kind of construction, or creation, as it penetrates, through the given literary or artistic product, into the mental and inner constitution of the producer, shaping his work.
What I need, you know, above all things, is criticism.
Though the poems of the Boeotian school (2) were unanimously assigned to Hesiod down to the age of Alexandrian criticism, they were clearly neither the work of one man nor even of one period: some, doubtless, were fraudulently fathered on him in order to gain currency; but it is probable that most came to be regarded as his partly because of their general character, and partly because the names of their real authors were lost.
For appreciative criticism of some of the great poets the essays of Lowell and of Matthew Arnold are among the best.
Much higher and harder exercises of judgment and penetration may reasonably be expected from the upper graduates in criticism.