cried


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cry on (someone's) shoulder

To tell one's troubles and woes to a sympathetic person. After the breakup, he cried on my shoulder all night long.
See also: cry, on, shoulder

cry the blues

1. Literally, to sing blues music or in that style. There was this old man crying the blues at the bar last night; it was a really moving bit of music.
2. By extension, to complain, whine, or express grief, especially as a means of gaining sympathy from others. Many people will cry the blues over trivial inconveniences, while millions of others silently suffer real hardships every day.
See also: blues, cry

cry uncle

To admit defeat and/or plead for mercy, especially in an informal physical contest of some kind. The brothers often play fought, but it was invariably the younger of the two who had to cry uncle by the end.
See also: cry, uncle

cry barley

To call for a truce, typically in a children's game. Don't cry barley now, you wuss! Let's keep playing Red Rover!
See also: cry

cry for the moon

To make an impractical or unreasonable request, especially one that is unlikely to happen. Oh, you want a later curfew, huh? Well, you're crying for the moon—11 o'clock is late enough!
See also: cry, moon

cry foul

To protest against something that has happened. A: "How could you go through my things without asking?" B: "Oh, don't cry foul—I was just looking for my sweater and I found it. It's not a big deal." Dad cried foul when I forgot to put gas in his car after borrowing it.
See also: cry, foul

cry in (one's) beer

To feel sorry for oneself. To bemoan one's fate or life. Don't cry in your beer, man. I know you're bummed about Amanda, but if she broke up with you, she's not the one.
See also: beer, cry

cry on (one's) shoulder

To bemoan one's problems to someone else. We need to try to cheer Ben up—he's been crying on my shoulder all week. Can I please cry on your shoulder for a little bit? I just found out I failed my Bio exam.
See also: cry, on, shoulder

cry over spilt milk

To be upset over something that cannot be fixed, often something minor. Please calm down, you're just crying over spilt milk. We already submitted the report, so we can't fix it now. A: "Why is Hannah so upset?" B: "Oh, she's just crying over spilt milk. She just fell down and ripped her stockings—she'll be fine."
See also: cry, milk, spilt

cry stinking fish

To undermine one's own efforts. To put oneself down. Primarily heard in UK. A: "And I'm awful at doing reports." B: "Come on, buddy, don't cry stinking fish! You're so talented and have so much to offer the company—don't put yourself down!"
See also: cry, fish, stinking

laugh all the way to the bank

To profit or benefit from something that is regarded by others as frivolous or stupid. That movie is dumb, but it's a big hit, and the studio executives will laugh all the way to the bank. They can mock us all they want because we'll be laughing all the way to the bank when our banana re-peeler is sold in stores nationwide.
See also: all, bank, laugh, way

laugh all the way to the bank

Fig. to be very happy about money that has been earned by doing something that other people might think is unfair or that they criticized. He may not be in the nicest business, but he is doing well and can laugh all the way to the bank. She makes tons of money doing what no one else will do and laughs all the way to the bank.
See also: all, bank, laugh, way

laugh all the way to the bank

to be pleased about the profit earned from doing something Team owners complain about the latest TV deal, but in fact they are laughing all the way to the bank. After we sold the house, my wife cried and I laughed all the way to the bank.
See also: all, bank, laugh, way

cry uncle

Also, say uncle. Concede defeat, as in The Serbs want the Bosnians to cry uncle, or If you say uncle right now, I'll let you go first in the next game. This phrase originated about 1900 as an imperative among school-children who would say, "Cry uncle when you've had enough (of a beating)." By the mid-1900s it was being used figuratively, as in the examples.
See also: cry, uncle

laugh all the way to the bank

Also, cried all the way to the bank. Exult in a financial gain from something that had either been derided or thought worthless. For example, You may not think much of this comedian, but he's laughing all the way to the bank. Despite the seeming difference between laugh and cry, the two terms are virtually synonymous, the one with cry being used ironically and laugh straightforwardly. [c. 1960]
See also: all, bank, laugh, way

laugh all the way to the bank

To take glee in making money, especially from activity that others consider to be unimpressive or unlikely to turn a profit.
See also: all, bank, laugh, way
References in periodicals archive ?
SIMON GREENING, 27, head of music at Liverpool's Juice FM ``I last cried when a friend of mine went travelling and I had to think about not seeing them for months.
I have also cried when I'm very happy, for example on my wedding day.
I had to do a lot of research and met a lot of angry young people and I cried a lot during those few years.
It is perhaps a good test -- the last time we cried, what did we cry for?
The boy who fell over Niagara Falls contains most of what has come to be identified with Ader's mature work, especially his witty use of the pared-down poetic metaphor (the sips of water contain the cataract in a glass; the suggestion of the watery falls recapitulates the pratfalls that make up a number of Ader's best projects as well as the tears he cried, and the ocean he drowned in).
I cried for what must have been close to 30 minutes.
The book is called 911: The Day America Cried, A collection of poems, letters, and stories on an American tragedy, ISBN 0-9713266-5-7, 288 pages, $15.
A friend of mine always refers to the fact that I cried at Jurassic Park.
Unlike their nondepressed counterparts in the study, depressed volunteers who cried while watching an upsetting film often didn't report accompanying spikes in sad feelings.
Both depressed and nondepressed women cried far more often than their male counterparts did.
The sky cried passionately, with a rage or a dripping.
The earth was very upset and cried whenever a tree fell.
Research carried out by tissue manufacturers Kleenex claims one in five fathers said that they cried at the birth of their first child and three-quarters of men think it is now socially acceptable to shed a tear.
ANTONIO BANDERAS and Justin Timberlake held hands and cried at the end of Shrek 2.