credit to

credit something to someone or something

 
1. Lit. to record a sum owed to the account of someone or something. I will credit this payment to your account. I am afraid that I accidentally credited your payment to George.
2. Fig. to give someone or something well-deserved praise. The entire organization credited much praise to Jeff. We had to credit much of our success to simple good luck.
See also: credit

credit to someone or something

of value or benefit to someone or something; of enough value or worth as to enhance someone or something. I always want to be a credit to my school. John is not what you would call a credit to his family.
See also: credit
References in classic literature ?
Now, sir, you have but to say the word, and I will spare you all uneasiness by presenting my letter of credit to one or other of these two firms.
It was not true business principle to allow credit to a strong- bodied young fellow of the working-class who was too lazy to work.
This," says he, "is to my bankers, the British Linen Company, placing a credit to your name.
Mr Abel's feelings did credit to his nature, and credit to your nature, ma'am, and his father's nature, and human nature.
Although I attach no sort of credit to the fantastic Indian legend of the gem, I must acknowledge, before I conclude, that I am influenced by a certain superstition of my own in this matter.
There was much to be done: his portmanteau to be packed, a credit to be got from the bank where he was a wealthy customer, and certain offices to be transacted for that other bank in which he was an humble clerk; and it chanced, in conformity with human nature, that out of all this business it was the last that came to be neglected.
How could she deny that credit to his assertions in one instance, which she had been obliged to give in the other?
The right thing was to correct them severely, if they were other than a credit to the family, but still not to alienate from them the smallest rightful share in the family shoebuckles and other property.
Sapsea has many admirers; indeed, the proposition is carried by a large local majority, even including non-believers in his wisdom, that he is a credit to Cloisterham.
Here's a new brother, regularly put down in black and white by Muster Gashford; a credit to the cause; one of the stick-at-nothing sort; one arter my own heart.
That man will prove a credit to my corps,' said Simon, turning thoughtfully upon his heel.
It's for your credit to be doing something, but it's not for the Judge's credit to let you
And when I explained that her answer, although doing credit to her feelings, hardly disposed of my difficulty, she replied:
She called every business the ID thieves had tried to scam and told them not to extend credit to the impostors.
45B offers a credit to employers whose employees receive cash tips from customers.