crazy

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crazy like a fox

Very clever, cunning, or shrewd while appearing foolish or mad. People thought I was crazy when I told them my idea for massive social networking site—crazy like a fox, more like it! Our boss is crazy like a fox; her daredevil schemes always sound like they'll bankrupt us, but they invariably bring in a huge profit.
See also: crazy, fox, like

batshit crazy

rude slang Unreasonably or uncontrollably wild, irrational, or insane. At first I liked his manic energy, but after a few dates I've come realize that he's just batshit crazy!
See also: batshit, crazy

go batshit crazy

1. rude slang To become uncontrollably or intensely irrational; to act in a wildly irrational manner. The drivers in this country seem to go completely batshit crazy if there's even a little bit of snow on the ground. If they get too much sugar, the kids start going batshit crazy and start running around the house screaming.
2. rude slang To become wildly or uncontrollably angry. My parents went totally batshit crazy when they found out I'd wrecked the car! Now, don't go batshit crazy or anything, but I've decided to move to Canada.
3. rude slang To become extremely excited or enthusiastic (about something). I've never understood that pop star's popularity, but kids just go batshit crazy for her music.
See also: batshit, crazy

go stir-crazy

To become acutely anxious, restless, irritable, irrational, and/or depressed from remaining for too long in an unstimulating, confined, and/or isolated environment. "Stir" in this usage is a slang word for prison. We thought taking our family vacation in a tiny cottage out in the country would be a nice break from city life, but we all went a bit stir-crazy after a few days. The doctor said I need to remain in bed as much as possible, but I'll go stir-crazy if I can't get out of the house at least once a day!

crazy as a loon

Insane. Often used jocularly. Don't leave me alone with Uncle Stu, he's crazy as a loon!
See also: crazy, loon

be as (something) as they come

To display a trait to the utmost degree. Bryce is as talented as they come. Once you see him on stage, you'll agree. These strawberries are as fresh as they come. They were literally just picked!
See also: come

crazy about (someone or something)

Very enthusiastically fond of someone or something. Teri is just crazy about her new boyfriend and won't stop talking about him. Ever since she started taking lessons as a kid, Amy has been crazy about tennis. I'm not crazy about that place, so can we go somewhere else for dinner?
See also: crazy

crazy as a betsy bug

Insane. Don't leave me alone with Uncle Stu, he's crazy as a betsy bug!
See also: betsy, bug, crazy

crazy in the head

Insane or dumb. Don't leave me alone with Uncle Stu, he's crazy in the head!
See also: crazy, head

drive (someone) crazy

1. To upset, irritate, or annoy someone to the point of distraction. It drives me crazy seeing all these people just staring at their phones all day long. Would you stop shouting, you're driving me crazy!
2. To cause someone to become unhinged, insane, or mentally unstable. All that pressure finally drove Steve crazy in the end. You kids are going to drive me crazy one of these days with all your arguing.
See also: crazy, drive

stir-crazy

Acutely anxious, restless, irritable, irrational, and/or depressed from remaining for too long in an unstimulating, confined, and/or isolated environment. "Stir" in this usage is a slang word for prison. We thought taking our family vacation in a tiny cottage out in the country would be a nice break from city life, but we all went a bit stir-crazy after a few days. The doctor said I need to remain in bed as much as possible, but I'll go stir-crazy if I can't get out of the house at least once a day!

crazy about someone or something

 and mad about someone or something; nuts about someone or something; crazy for someone or something
Fig. very fond of someone or something. Ann is crazy about John. He's crazy about her, too. I'm mad about their new song.
See also: crazy

*crazy as a betsy bug

 and *crazy as a peach-orchard boar; *crazy as a loon
Rur. acting as if insane. (*Also: as ~.) Tom: Susan says she's really the Queen of England. Bill: She's crazy as a betsy bug. Jill: David's a little eccentric, isn't he? Jane: Crazy as a loon, I'd say. What's wrong with Jim? He's acting as crazy as a peach-orchard boar.
See also: betsy, bug, crazy

crazy in the head

stupid or insane. Be quiet, Jed. You are just crazy in the head. Am I crazy in the head, or did I just see someone walking a leopard on a leash?
See also: crazy, head

drive someone crazy

 and drive someone insane; drive someone mad 
1. . Lit. to force someone into a state of insanity or mental instability. The sound of the wind howling drove me crazy. The dog's constant barking drove me insane.
2. Fig. to annoy or irritate someone. This itch is driving me crazy. All these telephone calls are driving me mad.
See also: crazy, drive

funny bone

 and crazy bone
a spot near the elbow bone that is very sensitive to the touch. Ouch, I hit my funny bone. Effie bumped her crazy bone and made a horrendous face.
See also: bone, funny

go crazy

 and go nuts
to become crazy, disoriented, or frustrated. It is so busy here that I think I will go crazy. Bob went nuts because his car got a flat tire.
See also: crazy

like crazy

 and like mad
Fig. furiously; very much, fast, many, or actively. People are coming in here like crazy. There isn't enough room for them all. We sold ice cream like crazy. It was a very hot day.
See also: crazy, like

*stir-crazy

crazy from being confined. (*Typically: be ~; become ~; go ~; get ~; make someone ~. stir is a slang word for prison.) I am going to go stir-crazy if I don't get out of this office.

crazy about, be

Also, be mad about. Be immoderately fond of or infatuated with, as in I'm crazy about lobster, or George is mad about his new saxophone. The first expression dates from the early 1900s. The second, with mad, is much older; Shakespeare had it as mad for in All's Well That Ends Well (5:3): "madde for her"; and mad about was common by the mid-1700s.
See also: crazy

crazy like a fox

Seemingly foolish but actually very shrewd and cunning. For example, You think Bob was crazy to turn it down? He's crazy like a fox, because they've now doubled their offer . This usage gained currency when humorist S.J. Perelman used it as the title of a book (1944). [Early 1900s] .
See also: crazy, fox, like

drive someone crazy

Also, drive someone mad or bananas or bonkers or nuts or up the wall ; drive someone to drink. Greatly exasperate someone, annoy to distraction. For example, His habitual lateness drives me crazy, or Apologizing over and over drives me bananas, or These slovenly workmen drive me up the wall, or Your nagging is driving me to drink. All of these hyperbolic expressions describe a person's extreme frustration, supposedly to the point of insanity ( crazy, mad, nuts, bonkers, and bananas all mean "insane"); up the wall alludes to climbing the walls to escape and to drink to imbibing alcohol to induce oblivion.
See also: crazy, drive

funny bone

1. A point on the elbow where the ulnar nerve runs close to the surface and produces a sharp tingling sensation when knocked against the bone. For example, Ouch! I just banged my funny bone. The expression is a pun on humerus (pronounced the same as humorous), the Latin name for the long bone of the arm. [Early 1800s]
2. A sense of humor, as in That comedian really tickles my funny bone. This expression is derived from def. 1.
See also: bone, funny

like crazy

Also, like mad; like nobody's business. With exceeding enthusiasm or speed, without restraint. For example, We shopped like crazy and bought all our furniture in one day, or Once he's out of the town limits he drives like mad, or The choir sang the Hallelujah Chorus like nobody's business. The first terms employ crazy and mad in the sense of "lunatic" as a hyperbole for lack of restraint; the third implies that no business could be conducted in such an extraordinary fashion. The first and third date from the 1920s, the second from the mid-1600s.
See also: crazy, like

crazy as a bedbug

AMERICAN, INFORMAL
If you describe someone as crazy as a bedbug, you mean that their behaviour is very strange or silly. By now she'd concluded that Peters was crazy as a bedbug. Note: Bedbugs are small wingless insects that live in beds and bedding. They feed by biting people and sucking their blood.
See also: bedbug, crazy

crazy as a loon

AMERICAN, INFORMAL
If you describe someone as crazy as a loon, you mean that their behaviour is very strange or silly. She was obviously crazy as a loon.
See also: crazy, loon

crazy like a fox

AMERICAN, INFORMAL
If you describe someone as crazy like a fox, you mean that they seem strange or silly but may in fact be acting in a clever way. He can be as scary in person as he is on screen — that man is crazy like a fox. Note: The image here is of the fox that is traditionally seen as clever and able to trick people.
See also: crazy, fox, like

crazy like a fox

very cunning or shrewd.
See also: crazy, fox, like

like ˈcrazy/ˈmad

(informal) very fast, hard, etc: running/working like crazy
See also: crazy, like, mad

crazy

1. n. a crazy person. The guy’s a crazy, and he keeps coming in here asking for money.
2. mod. cool. This stuff is really crazy, man. I love it!

crazy bone

n. the elbow. Ouch! I hit my crazy bone!
See also: bone, crazy

like crazy

and like mad
mod. furiously; very much, fast, many, or actively. Look at those people on the bank. They’re catching fish like mad! I’m running like mad and still can’t catch up.
See also: crazy, like

stir crazy

mod. anxious and mentally disturbed from being confined, as in prison. (see also stir.) I was going stir crazy in my little room, so I moved to a bigger place.
See also: crazy, stir

like crazy

Informal
To an exceeding degree: They were running around like crazy.
See also: crazy, like
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