cranny

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any (old) nook or cranny

Any part or section of a given place, especially those that are hard to see or reach. I don't know where you put your keys, they could be in any nook or cranny. There are so many books in the library that you can find all sorts of interesting things in any old nook or cranny there.
See also: any, cranny, nook

nook and cranny

Every possible place or part of something, down to the smallest ones. You need to clean every nook and cranny of this room before your grandmother gets here—it has to be spotless for her! I looked in every nook and cranny of the attic and couldn't find that box anywhere.
See also: and, cranny, nook

nook or cranny

Every possible place or part of something, down to the smallest ones. You need to clean every nook or cranny of this room before your grandmother gets here—it has to be spotless for her! I looked in every nook or cranny of the attic and couldn't find that box anywhere.
See also: cranny, nook

every nook and cranny

Fig. every small, out-of-the-way place or places where something can be hidden. We looked for the tickets in every nook and cranny. They were lost. There was no doubt. The decorator had placed flowers in every nook and cranny.
See also: and, cranny, every, nook

every nook and cranny

every part of a place Law books were stuffed into every nook and cranny of his office.
See also: and, cranny, every, nook

every nook and cranny

every part of a place This house is where I grew up. I know every nook and cranny of it.
See also: and, cranny, every, nook

nook and cranny, every

Everywhere, as in I've searched for it in every nook and cranny, and I still can't find it. This metaphoric idiom pairs nook, which has meant "an out-of-the-way corner" since the mid-1300s, with cranny, which has meant "a crack or crevice" since about 1440. Neither noun is heard much other than in this idiom.
See also: and, every, nook
References in periodicals archive ?
Coming in the form of nuggets, pellets or pencil tip-sized particles, dry ice gets dee into the nooks and crannies of a surface where it instantly reverts into a gas, expanding 400 times its size to remove grit from the inside out.
They're for our House Guests section, where young visitors will be able to search with torches in dark nooks and crannies for uninvited 'house guests'.
It's a childhood home to die for, a big old white wooden affair with nooks and crannies and an enveloping garden cultivated to an Edenesque fare-thee-well by William's father (Peter MacNeill).
An exquisite wooden set gives the dancers niches, corners, and crannies within which to develop their internal and external environments.
I have gnawed my sorrow to the bone I have chewed it bare and licked it clean The inside cartilage has harrowed my tongue But no marrow is left in its crannies.
You will never find this plant on pines, but it loves live oaks and baldcypress, which have bark with plenty of nooks and crannies to hold and germinate the seed.
The enchanted castle expands from one story to three stories and features all kinds of fascinating rooms, nooks and crannies, and even a dance floor for exciting new discovery and exploration.
Scores of bats have taken up lodgings in the nooks and crannies of Kielder Castle in Northumberland.
Use it on cookers, taps, pots and pans, tile grout and all those fiddly, hard-to-reach nooks and crannies.
The Philly police investigator, spokesman and patrolman has found 15 film locations in various crannies outside the Columbia Pictures lot in Hollywood and the Warner Bros.
Places of exchange should have nooks and crannies, playful and surprising with human-scale places to explore and hide in.
Tons of round walls, nooks and crannies, a random set of shallow-end stairs, a cradle, round and pointed over-vert extensions, snakeruns, sea shells and coral for coping, lots of vert, and a 3/4-pipe section.
The wall drawings of British artist Richard Wright have an austere grandeur, even when he bypasses a traditional strength of the mural form--its command of large architectural expanses--in favor of corners and crannies.
Sand thrown up by tracks or wheels will end up in the pintle's nooks and crannies.