cracking


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crack a bottle open

To open a bottle of something, usually an alcoholic drink. We cracked a bottle open to celebrate finishing of our first year of grad school.
See also: bottle, crack, open

crack a joke

To say something funny; to tell a joke. The teacher scolded me for cracking a joke in the middle of class.
See also: crack, joke

crack a smile

To smile. I got the baby to crack a smile by clapping and singing.
See also: crack, smile

crack down

1. verb To address or control something more strictly than in the past. After years of leniency, the school is finally cracking down on plagiarism.
2. noun A period of stricter control of something. When used as a noun, the phrase is usually written as one word. After years of leniency, there's finally been a crackdown on plagiarism at the school.
See also: crack, down

crack open

1. To open something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "crack" and "open." It's too hot in here—can we crack open a window? We cracked open a bottle of wine to celebrate finishing our first year of grad school.
2. To break open. A noun or pronoun can be used between "crack" and "open." The earthquake cracked the highway wide open.
3. To expose something scandalous or deceptive. A noun or pronoun can be used between "crack" and "open." That company's stock price plummeted after the media cracked open the CEO's embezzlement scandal. An anonymous tip to the police is what cracked the theft ring wide open.
See also: crack, open

crack some suds

slang To drink beer. Let's go to the bar and crack some suds.
See also: crack, suds

crack the door (open)

To open a door slightly. It's so hot in here—can we at least crack the door open?
See also: crack, door

crack the whip

To push or urge someone (usually one's subordinate) to work harder, likened to literally cracking a whip to control or urge on an animal. The boss is nervous that we'll lose this account, so he's really started cracking the whip on us.
See also: crack, whip

crack under the strain

To submit to the stress of a particular situation; to stop functioning due to the pressure. If you keep pushing your employees so hard, they'll eventually crack under the strain.
See also: crack, strain

crack up

1. verb To laugh a lot. We all cracked up at Josh's joke.
2. verb To cause someone to laugh a lot. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "crack" and "up." Josh's joke cracked us all up. That comedian just cracks me up.
3. verb To experience a mental or emotional breakdown. All those days of sleep deprivation finally caused me to crack up. She's terrified to leave the house all of a sudden—I think she's cracking up.
4. verb To destroy something. He drove into a tree and cracked up his car.
5. verb To be in an accident. I cracked up after losing control of my car.
6. noun An accident. When used as a noun, the phrase is typically hyphenated. I was in a crack-up when I lost control of my car and hydroplaned.
See also: crack, up

crack (something) wide open

1. To break open. A noun or pronoun can be used between "crack" and "open." The earthquake cracked the highway wide open.
2. To expose something scandalous or deceptive. A noun or pronoun can be used between "crack" and "open." That company's stock price plummeted after the media cracked the CEO's embezzlement wide scandal open. An anonymous tip to the police is what cracked the theft ring wide open.
See also: crack, open, wide

get a move on

To move, proceed, or work faster; to hurry. Get a move on, kids, or we're going to be late for the movie! We've got to get a move on if we want to finish this project by the end of the week.
See also: get, move, on

get cracking

To start working on something. This phrase is often used as an imperative. You need to get cracking, or you'll be up all night working on your book report! Let's get cracking—I don't want to spend all day cleaning out the garage!
See also: cracking, get

crack a bottle open

Fig. to open a bottle of liquor. Let's crack open a bottle and celebrate. He cracked a bottle open and poured a little for everyone to try.
See also: bottle, crack, open

crack a joke

to tell a joke. She's never serious. She's always cracking jokes. Every time Tom cracked a joke, his buddies broke up laughing.
See also: crack, joke

crack a smile

to grin; to smile. I was tellin' my best jokes, but Jim never cracked a smile. She looked surprised, and then cracked a big, beautiful smile.
See also: crack, smile

crack down (on someone or something)

to put limits on someone or something; to become strict about enforcing rules about someone or something. The police cracked down on the street gangs. They cracked down once last year too.
See also: crack, down

crack open

[for something brittle] to break or split open. The egg cracked open and a chick worked its way out. The side of the mountain cracked open and molten lava flowed out.
See also: crack, open

crack some suds

Sl. to drink some beer. Let's go out tonight and crack some suds. The guys wanted to watch the game and crack some suds.
See also: crack, suds

crack someone or something up

to damage someone or something. (See also crack someone up.) Who cracked my car up? Who cracked up my car? Who was driving? The accident cracked him up a little.
See also: crack, up

crack someone up

to make someone laugh very hard; to make someone break out laughing. You and your jokes really crack me up. That comedian really knows how to crack up an audience.
See also: crack, up

crack something up

to crash something; to destroy something (in an accident). The driver cracked the car up in an accident. The pilot cracked up the plane.
See also: crack, up

crack something(wide) open

 
1. Lit. to crack or split something. An incredible eruption cracked the volcano wide open.
2. Fig. to expose and reveal some great wrongdoing. The police cracked the drug ring wide open. The newspaper story cracked the trouble at city hall wide open.
See also: crack, open

crack under the strain

Fig. to have a mental or emotional collapse because of continued work or stress. He worked 80-hour weeks for a month and finally cracked under the strain.
See also: crack, strain

crack up

 
1. to have a wreck. The plane cracked up and killed two of the passengers. Whose car cracked up on the expressway?
2. to break out in laughter. The whole audience cracked up. I knew I would crack up during the love scene.
3. Sl. to have a mental or emotional breakdown. The poor guy cracked up. It was too much for him. You would crack up, too, if you had been through all he went through.
4. an accident; a wreck. (Usually crack-up.) There was a terrible crack-up on the expressway. There were four cars in the crack-up.
See also: crack, up

get cracking

Rur. to get to work. If you want to finish that quilt by Labor Day, you best get cracking. Sit down to your homework and get cracking!
See also: cracking, get

crack a joke

Make a joke, say something humorous, as in You can count on Grandpa to crack a joke on every occasion. This expression uses the verb to crack in the now obsolete sense of "briskly pronounce" or "boast." [Early 1700s]
See also: crack, joke

crack a smile

Smile, as in Betty was a very serious person; she rarely cracked a smile. This colloquialism transfers crack in the sense of "break" to breaking a serious facial expression into a smile.
See also: crack, smile

crack down

Act more forcefully to regulate, repress, or restrain. For example, The police cracked down on speeding. [1930s]
See also: crack, down

crack the whip

Behave in a domineering and demanding way toward one's subordinates. For example, He's been cracking the whip ever since he got his promotion. This expression, first recorded in 1647, alludes to drivers of horse-drawn wagons who snapped their whips hard, producing a loud cracking noise. Its figurative use dates from the late 1800s.
See also: crack, whip

crack up

1. Suffer an emotional breakdown, become insane, as in He might crack up under the strain. This usage alludes to the result of cracking one's skull; from the early 1600s to crack alone was used in this way. [Slang; early 1900s]
2. Damage or wreck a vehicle or vessel. For example, I'm always afraid that I'll crack up the car.
3. Experience a crash, as in We cracked up on the freeway in the middle of the ice storm.
4. Also, crack someone up. Burst or cause to burst out laughing, as in The audience cracked up, or That joke really cracked me up. [Slang; c. 1940] Also see break up, def. 6. All of these expressions derive from crack in the sense of "break into pieces" or "collapse," a usage dating from the late 1600s. Also see cracked up.
See also: crack, up

get a move on

Also, get cracking or going or rolling . Hurry up; also, start working. For example, Get a move on, it's late, or Let's get cracking, kids, or It's time we got going, or The alarm went off ten minutes ago, so get rolling. The first colloquial expression dates from the late 1800s. The second term, also colloquial, employs the verb to crack in the sense of "travel with speed," a usage dating from the early 1800s, but the idiom dates only from the first half of the 1900s. The third term dates from the late 1800s and also has other meanings; see get going. Get rolling alludes to setting wheels in motion and dates from the first half of the 1900s. Also see get busy; get on the stick.
See also: get, move, on

get cracking

see under get a move on.
See also: cracking, get

get cracking

INFORMAL
If you get cracking, you start doing something immediately and quickly. I realised that if we got cracking, we could make the last 700 miles to St Lucia within our deadline. I promised to get cracking on the deal.
See also: cracking, get

get a move on

INFORMAL
COMMON If you get a move on, you hurry. You'd better get a move on if you're going to make it back in time for the match. `I wish the driver would get a move on,' she said.
See also: get, move, on

crack the whip

If a person in authority cracks the whip, they make people work hard by being strict. They've recently installed a new management team to crack the whip. Donna stayed at home and cracked the whip over her three girls and son. Note: When someone makes people work hard by being strict with them, you can talk about the crack of their whip. He has, he says `a team of ten working hard under' him. You can almost hear the crack of his whip.
See also: crack, whip

get cracking

act quickly and energetically. informal
See also: cracking, get

get a move on

hurry up. informal
1992 Lisa Tuttle Lost Futures So stop worrying, sweetheart, and let's get a move on…I don't want to be late.
See also: get, move, on

crack a ˈjoke

tell a joke: He’s always cracking jokes in class.
See also: crack, joke

crack the ˈwhip

use your authority or power to make somebody work very hard, usually by treating them in a strict way: What you need to do is crack the whip and make sure that they do the job properly.
See also: crack, whip

get ˈcracking

(informal) start doing something quickly: We’ll have to get cracking with the painting if we want to be finished by Friday.There’s an awful lot to do, so let’s get cracking.
See also: cracking, get

get a ˈmove on

(spoken) hurry; do something faster: You’d better get a move on or you’ll be late. OPPOSITE: take your time (doing something/to do something/over something) (1)
See also: get, move, on

crack down

v.
1. To increase the intensity or severity involved in preventing or regulating something: The police are cracking down on drunk driving and issuing stiffer penalties. The police cracked down after the murder last week.
2. To increase the intensity or severity involved in punishing or repressing someone: The government has cracked down on protesters.
See also: crack, down

crack up

v.
1. To damage something or someone, as in an accident: I cracked up the car when I hit a tree. We gave him a remote control plane for his birthday, but he cracked it up on his very first flight.
2. To become damaged or wrecked: The plane cracked up when it hit the ground.
3. To praise someone or something highly, especially incorrectly. Often used in the passive: I am simply not the genius I'm cracked up to be. His friend cracked him up to be a great mechanic, but I thought his work was shoddy.
4. To have a mental or physical breakdown: We were afraid that the pilot might crack up under the stress.
5. To laugh very hard: She cracked up when I told her the joke.
6. To cause someone to laugh very hard: The funny movie cracked us up. The comedian cracked up the audience.
See also: crack, up

crack some suds

tv. to drink some beer. Let’s go out tonight and crack some suds.
See also: crack, suds

crack up

1. in. to have a wreck. The plane cracked up and killed two of the passengers.
2. in. to break out in laughter. I knew I would crack up during the love scene.
3. in. to have a nervous breakdown. The poor guy cracked up. It was too much for him.
4. n. an accident; a wreck. (Usually crack-up.) There was a terrible crack-up on the expressway.
See also: crack, up

Get cracking!

imperative Get moving!; Get started!; Hurry up! Hurry up! Get cracking!
See also: get

crack the whip

To behave in a domineering manner; demand hard work and efficiency from those under one's control.
See also: crack, whip
References in periodicals archive ?
Chertkov VY (2002) Modelling cracking stages of saturated soils as they dry and shrink.
Mold stress helps create the environment for stress corrosion cracking.
Duntemann gives an example of cracking that developed at the ends of pre-stressed concrete beams in a cooling tower being constructed at a synthetic fuel plant.
The existing methods for studying surface cracking usually consider a flat image (2D), which does not represent the true physical nature of the cracked surface and imposes certain limitations on diagnosis.
Compounds F4 and F6 gave the best resistance to flex cracking.
We're confident that the cracking sound and bright flash on ultrasound are related to the dynamic changes in pressure associated with a gas bubble in the joint.
Cracking is a major issue for the concrete industry, as it detracts from the aesthetics of concrete, can be a safety hazard, and may compromise durability or structural integrity.
Cracking and decohesion of large silicon and iron-rich intermetallic particles, as well as crystallographic shearing from persistent slip bands in the aluminum matrix, play an important role in crack initiation.
Powerful aircraft rotor wash Is pushing the M240H machine gun's feed tray cover to the cracking point.
The government's current anti-Ecstasy enforcement system, favored by law-and-order elected officials, clearly isn't working: Ecstasy's "streetification" is happening despite a series of tough new laws aimed at cracking down harder on its use.
The officials said the cracks are believed to be caused by stress corrosion cracking, which refers to cracking induced from the combined influence of tensile stress and a corrosive medium.
HIGHLY addictive, it gets its name from the cracking sound it makes when being burned.
The Air Force and Northrop Grumman, the prime contractor of the B-2, have been working on the new cracking issue since at least October 2000.