crackers


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Related to crackers: Christmas Crackers

bonkers

(ˈbɔŋkɚz)
1. and crackers mod. insane; crazy. I think I am going crackers.
2. mod. slightly intoxicated. She’s too bonkers to drive.

crackers

verb
References in classic literature ?
This cracker made Gringoire's skin bristle up all over.
A person who, because he has corns himself, always treads on other people's toes," answered the Roman Candle in a low whisper; and the Cracker nearly exploded with laughter.
I am laughing because I am happy," replied the Cracker.
They pelted the little dog with hard-tack, crackers, and even articles of furniture which were hard baked and heavy enough for missiles.
Women caught up their children and hurried into their houses, shutting the cracker doors carefully behind them.
No," said he; "we are bothered with cracker dust sometimes, but never with flour.
But Billina, who had flown to the top of a cracker house to be in a safe place, called out:
They had the most delicious dainties for the taking--strange breads and crackers, cheeses, sausages, sardines--wonderful foods that I never saw on our meagre home-table.
The professor had had a trifling altercation in the morning with that young gentleman, owing to a difference about the introduction of crackers in school-time; but his face resumed its habitual expression of bland courtesy as he said, "Master Osborne, I give you full permission to go and see your carriage friends--to whom I beg you to convey the respectful compliments of myself and Mrs.
And he himself brought her the golden-brown bouillon, in a dainty Sevres cup, with a flaky cracker or two on the saucer.
If I say, `Polly wants a cracker,' you understand me.
A negro teamster who had been dancing upon a cracker box with the hilarious encouragement of twoscore soldiers was deserted.
In the other end, cracker boxes were made to serve as furniture.
She found it very lovely, and sat down on a cracker keg to enjoy it with a heart full of the innocent sentiment of her years.
Whenever they halted to change, there he was--out of the carriage without letting down the steps, bursting about the inn-yard like a lighted cracker, pulling out his watch by lamp-light and forgetting to look at it before he put it up again, and in short committing so many extravagances that Kit's mother was quite afraid of him.