count off

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count off

1. To count in turn, as when dividing a group of people into smaller groups. A noun or pronoun can be used between "count" and "off." OK, kids, count off one through five so that we can make five groups.
2. To count the number of people or things in a group to ensure that everyone or everything is present. A noun or pronoun can be used between "count" and "off." Kids, take your seats on the bus so that I can count off and make sure everyone is here.
3. To count out loud so that everyone in a group starts something (such as a song or dance) at the same time. A noun or pronoun can be used between "count" and "off." Before launching into their routine, the cheerleaders counted off, "Five, six, seven, eight!"
4. To subtract from something, such as a score. A noun or pronoun can be used between "count" and "off." I had to count off five points for presentation because your project was a glue-covered mess.
5. To divide a group of things into smaller groups. A noun or pronoun can be used between "count" and "off." I counted off the batch of cookies so that each of the neighbors would get the same amount.
See also: count, off

count someone or something off

to count people or things, to see if they are all there. (See also count off.) Let's count them off to see who's missing. Count off each person, one by one. I counted each one off.
See also: count, off

count off

[for a series of people, one by one] to say aloud the next number in a fixed sequence. The soldiers counted off by threes. The sergeant told them to count off.
See also: count, off

count off

1. Count aloud from one end of a line of persons to the other, each person counting in turn. For example, The soldiers counted off one by one. This usage and the practice it describes come from the military.
2. Place in a separate group by counting, as in The office counted off the telephone books for each delivery route.
See also: count, off

count off

v.
1. To recite numbers in turn, as when dividing people or things into groups: The 24 children counted off by twos, forming a dozen pairs.
2. To count to an agreed upon number so that some group begins an activity at the same time: The conductor counted the band off, and they began to play. The director counted off the choir, and they began to sing. The conductor counted off, and the band began to play.
3. To decrease the score or evaluation of someone by some amount: The professor will count you off five points if you skip a class.
4. To deduct some amount from a score or evaluation: The teacher counted off one point for each mistake. The Olympic judges counted a tenth of a point off for the gymnast's wobbly landing. The teacher counts off for misspelled words.
See also: count, off
References in periodicals archive ?
In the statement announcing his resignation, Mr Arnott counts off the incidents one by one - "the Steven Woolfe fracas, the Diane James fiasco, the Anne-Marie Waters debacle, the John Rees-Evans bizarreness, the countless leaks, briefings and character assassinations.
Each one counts off exactly 12 hours before stopping and passing the figurative baton to the other.
Paired with an iPhone or Android app, the SmartSeries is used with a stopwatch on the phone that counts off the dentist-recommended two minutes of brushing.
Molloy counts off some of the glory days the duo helped to engineer at Bohs - including that league and FAI Cup double, the wins at Aberdeen and at Kaiserslautern in the UEFA Cup.
The first player calls their top card and the second player counts off that number from their pack and then replaces these cards on top of their deck.
Next to him, a woman who holds his hand in one of hers and with the other counts off prayer beads on a chain, deeply absorbed in thought.
Shake down your stocking this Christmas and all the usual suspects will fall out, says Paul Rees, editor of Q magazine, as he counts off the albums that will crowd out Santa's sleigh
With the camera focused on his white socks, the boy struggles to balance as the avatar counts off seconds.
Broemmelsiek even counts off the seconds while the coffee barista pulls a lever that will send steaming water through those grinds: He likes four seconds and not a second more.
But Roy hasn't just got a huge influence on the pitch, his word counts off it as well.
After the sensor sees the end of the label, it counts off a second set of pulses before decelerating the dispenser.
A very accurate clock counts off a second that's extremely close in duration to the world's definition of that unit of time--i.
In a jazz jam session, the music begins when someone counts off the tune-- one, two, three, four--which establishes the tempo and rhythmic pattern.
Matthew counts off the days until his teacher's arrival and loves his lessons.