References in classic literature ?
Today is the date of my last letter, and the Count has taken steps to prove that it was genuine, for again I saw him leave the castle by the same window, and in my clothes.
I was awakened by the Count, who looked at me as grimly as a man could look as he said, "Tomorrow, my friend, we must part.
The Count stood up, and said, with a sweet courtesy which made me rub my eyes, it seemed so real, "You English have a saying which is close to my heart, for its spirit is that which rules our boyars, `Welcome the coming, speed the parting guest.
I knew than that to struggle at the moment against the Count was useless.
But, my dear count," said Albert, "we shall abuse your kindness.
Yes," continued the count, "it was at first arranged in this way; but I think since yesterday some change has taken place in the order of the ceremony.
The mandaia* never fails, never trembles, never strikes thirty times ineffectually, like the soldier who beheaded the Count of Chalais, and to whose tender mercy Richelieu had doubtless recommended the sufferer.
Really, count," replied Franz, "one would think that you had studied the different tortures of all the nations of the world.
The man who had accused De Coude, and the two others who had been playing, stood looking expectantly at the count.
And then, as the others still hesitated to do so: "Come, I shall do it myself if no other will," and he stepped forward toward the count.
The count went dead white, and then very slowly he withdrew his hand, and in it were three cards.
Gentlemen," he continued, "monsieur le count did not know that those cards were in his pocket.
And why not," asked the Count, "when your meaning can be explained by anybody in two words?
Laura looked at the Count with her dislike for him appearing a little too plainly in her face.
And if Count Fosco must divide murderers into classes, I think he has been very unfortunate in his choice of expressions.