couch

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couch potato

Someone who often engages in sedentary activities, usually understood as frequently watching television. Lisa wants to date a man who loves to travel and explore, not a couch potato who watches television all the time.
See also: couch, potato

couch potato

a lazy individual, addicted to television-watching. All he ever does is watch TV; he's become a real couch potato. Couch potatoes can tend to become very fat and unhealthy, you know.
See also: couch, potato

couch something in something

to express something in carefully chosen or deceptive words. He tended to couch his explanations in arcane vocabulary. She couched her words in an overly polite manner.
See also: couch

the casting couch

  (humorous)
a situation in which an actor, usually a woman actor, agrees to have sex with someone in order to get a part in a film or play Thankfully, the casting couch is no longer the only route to success for aspiring young actresses.
See also: casting, couch

a couch potato

  (informal)
a person who does not like physical activity and prefers to sit down, usually to watch television
Usage notes: A couch is a piece of furniture that people sit on.
The remote control television was invented for couch potatoes.
See also: couch, potato

casting couch

n. a legendary couch found in the offices of casting directors for use in seducing young people by offering them roles. They say the director got his job on the casting couch, too.
See also: casting, couch

couch potato

n. a lazy, do-nothing television watcher. (see also sofa spud.) If there was a prize for the best couch potato, my husband would win it.
See also: couch, potato

couch-doctor

and couch-turkey
n. a psychiatrist; a psychoanalyst. I finally walked out on my couch-doctor. Now I’m getting it all together. I bought three new cars for that couch-turkey! Now I’m paying for his kid’s college!

couch-turkey

verb
References in classic literature ?
But finally they dismissed us with a warning, couched in excellent Greek, I suppose, and dropped tranquilly in our wake.
On the next day, in its number of January 15th, the Daily Telegraph published an article couched in the following terms:
This invitation to drink, couched, as it was, in such informal terms, came very strangely from Nastasia Philipovna.
At the same time it is couched in so unfortunate a manner, and certain phrases in it are of so provocative a character, that its publication would undoubtedly lead to a most dangerous state of feeling in this country.
It is couched, like so much of his work, in the autobiographic form, which next to the dramatic form is the most natural, and which lends itself with such flexibility to the purpose of the author.
She saw a score of warriors with couched lances bearing down upon her.