corridor


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corridors of power

The offices of leaders or those with authority. I want to be in the corridors of power someday—I'm sick of having to take orders from other people.
See also: corridor, of, power

corridors of power

The offices of powerful leaders. For example, As clerk to a Supreme Court justice, Jim thought he'd get his foot inside the corridors of power . This term was first used by C.P. Snow in his novel Homecomings (1956) for the ministries of Britain's Whitehall, with their top-ranking civil servants. Later it was broadened to any high officials.
See also: corridor, of, power

the corridors of power

the senior levels of government or administration, where covert influence is regarded as being exerted and significant decisions are made.
This expression comes from the title of C. P. Snow 's novel The Corridors of Power ( 1964 ). Although most usual with power , the phrase can be more specifically applied to the most influential levels of the hierarchy within a particular place or organization, especially when they are regarded as operating covertly. The French word coulisse (meaning ‘the wings in a theatre’ and ‘corridor’) has a similar figurative sense of the corridor as a place of negotiation and behind-the-scenes scheming.
See also: corridor, of, power

the corridors of ˈpower

the places where important decisions in government are madeThis expression comes from the title of a book by C.P. Snow, published in 1964.
See also: corridor, of, power

corridors of power

The places or positions from which people in authority wield power.
See also: corridor, of, power
References in classic literature ?
Presently we approached a great chamber more brightly lighted than the corridors.
His hands smelt of that peculiar odour which he had first noticed that morning in the corridor.
A moment later Carthoris and Thuvia entered the corridor from the secret chamber.
But I was too quick for it, and so, half hopping, half flying, it scurried down another corridor with me close upon its heels.
The stairway and the corridor above were lighted by small flares which revealed several doors in the walls of the upper passageway.
Ghek made no reply, but moved rapidly through the winding subterranean corridors until Gahan began to realize how truly was he in the hands of this strange monster.
And while I was thus engaged and had for the moment forgotten my apprehensions concerning prowling beasts, I was startled into tense silence by a distinct and unmistakable sound coming from the dark corridor farther toward the heart of the cliff--the sound of padded feet moving stealthily in my direction.
She opened a door near the fireplace, which led, through a little corridor hung with rare prints, to her own boudoir.
As he spoke, he looked back with astonishment at Francis Westwick, standing outside in the corridor, and eyeing the interior of the bedchamber with an expression of undisguised disgust.
Eustace speaks: 'My dear fellow, be particularly careful not to make any noise; don't bowl your chair up and down the corridor to-night.
But, after I had followed them from the throne room, through several other apartments, and down a long corridor, I found my further progress barred by a soldier who stood guard before a doorway through which the officer conducted Victory.
At a sudden turning of the corridor, daylight flooded them and Bukawai stepped out into a small, circular basin in the hill, apparently the crater of an ancient volcano, one of those which never reached the dignity of a mountain and are little more than lava-rimmed pits closed to the earth's surface.
The cry had seemed to him to come from the further end of the long corridor - in the direction, indeed, of the room where Mr.
And clutching at the cold door post, she clambered up the steps and got rapidly into the corridor of the carriage.
In the corridors were many people, and with his eyes on the broad shoulders of the assistant district attorney, Thorndike pushed his way through them.