corn

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Related to corns: soft corns

acknowledge the corn

To admit to or acknowledge one's fault, shortcoming, mistake, crime, or naiveté. When they arrested me, I decided I might as well acknowledge the corn and confess to stealing the car. Especially since I was still driving it.
See also: acknowledge, corn

pee in (someone's) Corn Flakes

rude slang To really upset, irritate, or disappoint someone. Sorry to pee in your Corn Flakes, but you won't get any credits for the class unless you attend every single lecture. A: "Watch out, the boss is in a foul mood today." B: "Wow, I wonder who peed in his Corn Flakes?"
See also: corn, Flake, pee

piss in (someone's) Corn Flakes

rude slang To really upset, irritate, or disappoint someone. Sorry to piss in your Corn Flakes, but you won't get any credits for the class unless you attend every single lecture. A: "Watch out, the boss is in a foul mood today." B: "Wow, I wonder who pissed in his Corn Flakes?"
See also: corn, Flake, piss

like a can of corn

Rur. very easy. Whipping up dinner for twelve is like a can of corn, as far as Jane is concerned. The championship game was like a can of corn for our team. We won easily.
See also: can, corn, like, of

can of corn

1. n. a baseball that drops straight down into the glove of a waiting player (for an out). (Since the 1940s.) It’s a can of corn! Right into Sammy’s mitt.
2. n. something that is really easy [to do], as in easy as catching a can of corn. (From the image of an old-time grocery store clerk who would grasp a can from the top shelf with the special long tool, and then drop it straight down into his hand.) Nothing to it. A can of corn.
See also: can, corn, of

corn

n. money. I need some corn to pay the rent.

corn squabble

n. a fight. (Perhaps referring to chickens fighting over corn.) Stop this silly corn squabble and let’s try to talk this through.
See also: corn, squabble

corned

mod. alcohol intoxicated. Let’s go out and get corned!
See also: corn

can of corn

Sports
Something that is easily accomplished, especially a routine catch of a fly ball in baseball.
See also: can, corn, of
References in classic literature ?
I say, Sambo, you go to spilin' the hands, I'll tell Mas'r o' you," said Quimbo, who was busy at the mill, from which he had viciously driven two or three tired women, who were waiting to grind their corn.
Tom waited till a late hour, to get a place at the mills; and then, moved by the utter weariness of two women, whom he saw trying to grind their corn there, he ground for them, put together the decaying brands of the fire, where many had baked cakes before them, and then went about getting his own supper.
I go to Grantham," said the Corn Engrosser, "but I shall lodge tonight at Newark, if I can get so far upon my way.
Why, as thou art an honest fellow and a rich fellow," said the Corn Engrosser, "I mind not thy company; but, in sooth, I have no great fondness for beggars.
Also, others that had taken land gave it to the few that held on, being paid in return with corn and fat roots, and bear-skins, and fishes which the farmers got from the fishermen in exchange for corn.
Moreover, the strongest man in the council was Sea-Lion, and him the land-owners gave land to secretly, along with many bearskins and baskets of corn.
But this was not corn, and so it was safe from such enemies as he.
This further experience also I gained: I said to myself, I will not plant beans and corn with so much industry another summer, but such seeds, if the seed is not lost, as sincerity, truth, simplicity, faith, innocence, and the like, and see if they will not grow in this soil, even with less toil and manurance, and sustain me, for surely it has not been exhausted for these crops.
they know well how to grind corn small, and make white dust out of it.
An agreement had been made with the old servant, and on the road the bailiff had learned that everywhere the corn was still standing in the fields, so that his one hundred and sixty shocks that had not been carried were nothing in comparison with the losses of others.
But after I saw barley grow there, in a climate which I knew was not proper for corn, and especially that I knew not how it came there, it startled me strangely, and I began to suggest that God had miraculously caused His grain to grow without any help of seed sown, and that it was so directed purely for my sustenance on that wild, miserable place.
But it was not till the fourth year that I could allow myself the least grain of this corn to eat, and even then but sparingly, as I shall say afterwards, in its order; for I lost all that I sowed the first season by not observing the proper time; for I sowed it just before the dry season, so that it never came up at all, at least not as it would have done; of which in its place.
Upon the whole, the Spaniards acted the moderators between them; and as they had obliged the two Englishmen not to hurt the three while they were naked and unarmed, so they now obliged the three to go and rebuild their fellows' two huts, one to be of the same and the other of larger dimensions than they were before; to fence their ground again, plant trees in the room of those pulled up, dig up the land again for planting corn, and, in a word, to restore everything to the same state as they found it, that is, as near as they could.
Being all now good friends--for common danger, as I said above, had effectually reconciled them-- they began to consider their general circumstances; and the first thing that came under consideration was whether, seeing the savages particularly haunted that side of the island, and that there were more remote and retired parts of it equally adapted to their way of living, and manifestly to their advantage, they should not rather move their habitation, and plant in some more proper place for their safety, and especially for the security of their cattle and corn.
I should like well to hear them neigh over their hardly earned feed of corn, and see them, with their moist necks freed from the harness, dipping their eager nostrils into the muddy pond.