cook the books


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cook the books

to keep false financial records for an organization We're not going to cook the books or lie about the health of our business.
See also: book, cook

cook the books

  (informal)
to record false information in the accounts of an organization, especially in order to steal money (usually in continuous tenses) One of the directors had been cooking the books and the firm had been losing money for years.
See also: book, cook

cook the books

Falsify a company's financial records, as in An independent audit showed that they've been cooking the books for years. This slangy phrase was first recorded in 1636.
See also: book, cook
References in periodicals archive ?
It's obvious that Andersen helped Enron cook the books.
Just like Enron executives, they cook the books and snow the public.
US stocks lost ground in early trading yesterday after President Bush failed to calm down a scandal-weary Wall Street despite proposing stiff penalties for companies and executives who cook the books.
Mr Mallon said: "I do not go along with the theory that he is here to cook the books.
Good internal controls return power to senior management," he said, "making it harder for lower level officials to cook the books or misrepresent their performance.
But the Postal Service has been known to cook the books.
What little information the regionals did have came from the countries' own central banks, who often found it expedient to cook the books, or from the big banks, who themselves were flying blind.
The city Redistricting Commission might have given up on robbing the Valley, but it left open the opportunity to cook the books for political purposes.