control

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control freak

Someone who has an obsessive or compulsive need to control every aspect of a situation and/or the ways in which others act. My father can be such a control freak sometimes, always dictating how I should be living my life. Janice is a real control freak—she wouldn't even let me help her vacuum the carpet!
See also: control, freak

damage control

The efforts made to reduce, negate, or counteract damage, loss, or any other unfavorable outcome. The IT department was on serious damage control after it became apparent that our servers had been hacked. The senator has been doing damage control ever since he let slip racist remarks during a television interview.
See also: control, damage

controlled substance

A drug whose availability is limited by law. A: "I thought you could just find your medication on the shelf at the pharmacy." B: "Nah, I'm on a new one, and it's a controlled substance, so I have a prescription for it." I'm really glad I didn't follow in my brother's footsteps and become addicted to controlled substances.
See also: control, substance

in control

1. In charge; possessing the final authority in a hierarchy or situation. Who's in control here? I want to talk to the ranking officer.
2. Confident and capable, often when faced with a stressful situation. Your mother was terrified when she first learned to drive, but now she is completely in control behind the wheel.
See also: control

bring someone or something under one's control

to achieve dominion over someone or something. The dictator was at last able to bring the army under his control. Harry could not bring Ron under his control. Walter could not be brought under Lily's control.
See also: bring, control

*control over someone or something

the power to direct or manage someone or something. (*Typically: get ~; have ~; give someone ~.) I have no control over Mary. I can't stop her from running away. Who gave you control over what goes on in this house?
See also: control

control the purse strings

 and hold the purse strings
Fig. to be in charge of the money in a business or a household. I control the purse strings at our house. Mr. Williams is the treasurer. He controls the purse strings.
See also: control, purse, string

exercise power over

someone or something and exercise control over someone or something; exercise influence over someone or something to have someone or something under one's control or influence. The dictator exercised power over the island for many years. See if you can exercise some control over your appetite. I wish I could exercise some influence over the committee.
See also: exercise, power

in control of someone or something

 
1. in charge of someone or something. Who is in control of this place? I am not in control of her. She works for another department.
2. to have someone or something mastered or subdued; to have achieved management of someone or something. You should be in control of your dog at all times. The attendant was instructed to be in control of his patient at all times.
See also: control, of

*out of control

 
1. Lit. [of something, such as a machine] not responding to direction or instructions. (*Typically: be ~; go ~.) The computer is out of control and making funny-looking characters all over the screen. My CD player is out of control and only makes screeching noises.
2. and *out of hand Fig. acting wildly or violently. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) Watch out, that dog is out of control. The kids got out of hand again.
See also: control, of, out

rage out of control

to become uncontrollable. The fire raged out of control and threatened the residential area. If we didn't do something quickly, the fire would be raging out of control.
See also: control, of, out, rage

take control of someone or something

to get the power and right to direct someone or something. I will take control of him and see that he does what I want. Will you take control of the Wilson project?
See also: control, of, take

*under control

Fig. manageable; restrained and controlled; not out of control. (*Typically: be ~; bring someone or something ~; get someone or something ~; have someone or something ~; keep someone or something ~.) We finally got things under control and functioning smoothly. The doctor felt she had the disease under control and that I would get well soon.
See also: control

out of control

unable to be managed or limited The weeds in the garden are out of control.
See also: control, of, out

damage control

Measures to minimize or curtail loss or harm. For example, As soon as they discovered the leak to the press, the senator's office worked night and day on damage control . Used literally since the 1950s, specifically for limiting the effect of an accident on a ship, this term began to be used figuratively in the 1970s.
See also: control, damage

out of control

Also, out of hand. No longer under management, direction, or regulation; unmanageable or unruly. For example, Housing costs are out of control, or The children were getting out of hand again. The first term uses control in the sense of "restraint," a usage dating from the late 1500s; the variant uses hand in the sense of "power" or "authority," and dates from the late 1800s.
See also: control, of, out

spin control

Manipulation of news, especially political news, as in The White House press secretary is a master of spin control. This idiom uses spin in the sense of "interpretation," that is, how something will be interpreted by the public (also see put a spin on). [c. 1980] Also see spin doctor.
See also: control, spin
References in periodicals archive ?
The nanometer-sized tip, which can be heated to 1000 degrees Celsius (1,832 degrees Fahrenheit), is attached to a bendable cantilever that controllably scans the surface of the substrate material, in this case a polymer invented by chemists at IBM Research in Almaden, California, with the accuracy of one nanometer one millionth of a millimeter.
The balloon controllably engages the vessel wall to gently and atraumatically occlude blood flow during infusion thus providing drug concentrations hundreds of times greater at the site of local delivery than traditional systemic drug administration.
Temporally and spatially selective microwave assisted cure has been shown to controllably alter local area cure rate of a fiber glass/epoxy composite.
VNUS's proprietary products include the VNUS Closure([R]) system, which employs a disposable radiofrequency catheter that controllably heats and closes diseased veins.
These networks comprised of metallic or semiconducting NWs connected to each other via junctions with controllably random property distributions lead to new and unexpected levels of connectivity that are inherently scale dependent, creating opportunities for entirely new kinds of self-organised materials and devices.
The hydrogen atoms can be switched controllably between two different configurations by applying a voltage pulse.
The patent generally relates to a system for controllably discharging fasteners from an applicator.
This new technology enables converters and manufacturers to make more product with less source plastic by controllably expanding solid-state polymers with billions of microscopic cells within its structure - thereby dramatically reducing the cost and weight of plastic products, and improving end product functionality without compromising performance.
By leveraging end-to-end virtualization, the company allows applications to operate outside of Windows in a controllably secure environment with no performance impact on the endpoint.
The tip, similar to the kind used in atomic force microscopes, is attached to a bendable cantilever that controllably scans the surface of the substrate material with the accuracy of one nanometer-a millionth of a millimeter.
Their systems rapidly and controllably lower patient body temperature, and precisely maintain a specified target temperature for the desired duration before returning the patient to normothermic levels.
Cardium's InnerCool Therapies subsidiary is a San Diego-based medical technology company in the emerging field of temperature modulation therapy which is designed to rapidly and controllably cool the body in order to reduce cell death and damage following acute ischemic events such as cardiac arrest or stroke, and to potentially lessen or prevent associated injuries such as adverse neurological outcomes.
In 2004, the same group controllably manipulated the charge state of individual atoms using an STM.
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