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contrast (someone or something) with (someone or something else)

 and contrast (someone or something) to (someone or something else)
to examine people or things in a way that will show their differences. Contrast Sally with Sam, for instance, to see real differences. Contrast the busy geometry of a Gothic cathedral to the simple lines of an old Saxon castle.

contrast with someone or something

1. to be different from someone or something. Bill's cheery attitude really contrasts with the gloom of his twin brother, Bob. This stiped tie really contrasts with that polka-dot shirt.
2. [for a color or pattern, etc.] to show a marked difference with or complement another. The black one contrasts nicely with the white one.
References in classic literature ?
The general tone of the story belongs to all ranks and all countries, which emulate each other in describing the rambles of a disguised sovereign, who, going in search of information or amusement, into the lower ranks of life, meets with adventures diverting to the reader or hearer, from the contrast betwixt the monarch's outward appearance, and his real character.
It was a wild masquerade of all imaginable costumes--every struggling throng in every street was a dissolving view of stunning contrasts.
The contrast was as striking as it could have been eighteen years before, when Rigg was a most unengaging kickable boy, and Raffles was the rather thick-set Adonis of bar-rooms and back-parlors.
The half-realized idea of identity in the mind of Miss Dunross dropped out of it instantly, expelled by the substantial conclusion which the contrast implied.
In painful contrast to them stands commonplaceness, always a fatal fault.
If there are several of them it is a further question whether the author properly contrasts them in such a way as to secure interest.
This vein is no other than that of contrast, which runs through all the works of the creation, and may probably have a large share in constituting in us the idea of all beauty, as well natural as artificial: for what demonstrates the beauty and excellence of anything but its reverse?
The jeweller knows that the finest brilliant requires a foil; and the painter, by the contrast of his figures, often acquires great applause.
How divinely do vault and arch here contrast in the struggle: how with light and shade they strive against each other, the divinely striving ones.
To arrive at the general it is necessary that we should be able to contrast it with a number of relatively precise images or words for particular occurrences; so long as all our images and words are vague, we cannot arrive at the contrast by which the general is defined.
But like or dislike "the people" as something apart he could not, not only because he lived with "the people," and all his interests were bound up with theirs, but also because he regarded himself as a part of "the people," did not see any special qualities or failings distinguishing himself and "the people," and could not contrast himself with them.
In his methodical brain there were distinctly formulated certain aspects of peasant life, deduced partly from that life itself, but chiefly from contrast with other modes of life.
Nesbit was not more than twenty-five, very small, with a pleasant, ugly face; she had very bright eyes, high cheekbones, and a large mouth: the excessive contrasts of her colouring reminded one of a portrait by one of the modern French painters; her skin was very white, her cheeks were very red, her thick eyebrows, her hair, were very black.
These Annals of the English Stage, from Thomas Betterton to Edmund [74] Kean, are full of the colours of life in their most emphatic and motley contrasts, as is natural in proportion as the stage itself concentrates and artificially intensifies the character and conditions of ordinary life.
London, in its social aspect, is the city of contrasts.