contrary

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contrary to popular opinion

Opposite to what is popularly or generally expected or believed. Usually used to introduce such a statement. Contrary to popular opinion, higher taxes end up benefiting people more than lower ones.

contrary to all reason

Despite what definitely should be the case. Describes an occurrence that is unthinkable or unimaginable. And then, contrary to all reason, I found that my bank account was totally depleted. There should have still been thousands of dollars in there!
See also: all, contrary, reason

contrary to (something)

In opposition to something. There's no way we can get all these documents scanned in a week, contrary to what the boss thinks. Contrary to popular opinion, higher taxes end up benefiting people more than lower ones.
See also: contrary

contrary to popular belief

Opposite to what is popularly or generally expected or believed. Usually used to introduce such a statement. Contrary to popular belief, higher taxes end up benefiting people more than lower ones.
See also: belief, contrary, popular

on the contrary

Opposite to what someone has just said. Our business is not receding; on the contrary, we are experiencing a very robust level of growth. A: "Don't you hate Brussels sprouts?" B: "On the contrary, I think they can be very tasty—if they're cooked the right way."
See also: contrary, on

contrary to something

in spite of something that seems to suggest otherwise; regardless of something else. Contrary to what you might think, I am neat and tidy. Contrary to public opinion, my uncle is well and healthy.
See also: contrary

to the contrary

 and on the contrary
as the opposite of what has been stated; contrary to what has been stated. The brown horse didn't beat the black horse. To the contrary, the black one won. Among spiders, the male is not the larger one. On the contrary, the female is larger.
See also: contrary

on the contrary

It's the opposite, as in Is his shoulder hurting?-On the contrary, it's all better, or We thought you didn't like opera.-On the contrary, I love it. This phrase, at first put as by or for or in the contrary, dates from the late 1300s; on has been used since the mid-1800s.
See also: contrary, on

to the contrary

To the opposite effect, in denial, as in No matter what they say to the contrary, I am positive that he was present. This idiom was first recorded in 1512. Also see on the contrary.
See also: contrary

contrary to popular beˈlief/oˈpinion

although it is not what most people consider to be true: Contrary to popular belief, many cats dislike milk.

on the ˈcontrary

,

ˌquite the ˈcontrary

used to emphasize that the opposite of what has been said is true: It’s not that I don’t like him — on the contrary, he seems very pleasant.I don’t find him funny at all. Quite the contrary.
See also: contrary, on

to the ˈcontrary

showing or proving the opposite: Unless you hear from me to the contrary, expect me on Friday at about 6 o’clock.She was convinced that John was not capable of murder, in spite of all the evidence to the contrary.
See also: contrary

by contraries

Obsolete
In opposition to what is expected.
See also: contrary

on the contrary

In opposition to what has been stated or what is expected: I'm not sick; on the contrary, I'm in the peak of health.
See also: contrary, on

to the contrary

To the opposite effect from what has been stated or what is expected: Despite what you say to the contrary, this contract is fair.
See also: contrary