contact


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Related to contact: contact dermatitis

no plan survives contact with the enemy

Military plans always need to be changed once they are enacted in real-life military situations. The saying emphasizes the need for flexibility, as opposed to strict adherence to strategy. It is attributed to Helmuth von Moltke the Elder, a 19th-century Prussian field marshal. Men, be ready to make changes on the battlefield—we all know that no plan survives contact with the enemy.
See also: contact, enemy, no, plan, survive

bring (someone or something) into contact with (someone or something)

1. To introduce two people so that they can communicate in the future. In this usage, the first person is named after "bring" and the second person after "with." My best friend wants to get fit, so I brought her into contact with my personal trainer.
2. To cause something to physically touch something else. This usage can refer to both people and things. Don't bring that wire into contact with this one! I start sneezing any time I am brought into contact with pollen.
See also: bring, contact

come in(to) contact

1. Literally, to touch someone or something. Jill got chicken pox too after coming in contact with her cousins while they were sick. Be careful not to come into contact with that plant—it's poison ivy.
2. To encounter someone or something. I'd never come into contact with this theory before, but it's pretty interesting.
See also: come, contact

be in contact with (one)

To communicate with one. Has anyone been in contact with grandma since the storm hit? Don't worry, I'll be in contact with you once I have some more information.
See also: contact

make contact with (someone or something)

1. To communicate with someone. Has anyone made contact with Grandma since the storm hit?
2. To touch someone or something. Be careful not to make contact with that plant—it's poison ivy. We have a massive leak because the construction crew made contact with a pipe while drilling in our basement.
3. To engage with an unknown entity for the first time. Do you think we'll ever make contact with intelligent life? The government strictly forbids anyone from making contact with the indigenous tribe.
See also: contact, make

have contact with (one)

To communicate with one. Has anyone had contact with Grandma since the storm hit?
See also: contact, have

point of contact

A person or place one can go to in order to find information, ask questions, or access or receive services. Our account manager Sarah will be your new point of contact moving forward if you need any information about your account. The consulate should be your first point of contact should you need any assistance during your travels.
See also: contact, of, point

bring someone or something into contact with someone or something

to cause things or people to touch or associate with one another. She hasn't been the same since I brought her into contact with the child who had chicken pox. Don't bring your hand in contact with the poison ivy. Don't bring him into contact with Fred.
See also: bring, contact

come in(to) contact

 (with someone or something)
1. Lit. to touch someone or something, probably unknowingly. How many people have come into contact with the sick man? He came in contact with almost no one.
2. Fig. to meet up with and learn about someone or something. Have you ever come into contact with trigonometry before? I have never come in contact with anything so difficult.
See also: come, contact

*contact with someone a link to someone

resulting in communication. (*Typically: be in ~; have ~; make~.) I have had no contact with Bill since he left town. Tom made contact with a known criminal last month.
See also: contact, link

in contact (with someone or something)

communicating with someone or a group; to share information with someone or a group. I have been in contact with our supplier, who will deliver the part next week. I am in contact with the Senate committee now.
See also: contact

lose contact with someone or something

 and lose touch with someone or something
[for communication with someone or a group] to fail or fade away; to let one's friendship or relationship with someone or a group lapse. I hope I don't lose contact with you. I don't want to lose touch with my old friends.
See also: contact, lose

ˌpoint of ˈcontact

a place where you go or a person that you speak to when you are dealing with an organization: The receptionist is the first point of contact most people have with the clinic.
See also: contact, of, point

lose ˈtouch/ˈcontact (with somebody/something)

not write/speak to somebody or not hear/read about somebody/something as you did in the past: She lost touch with most of her old friends when she moved to London.
See also: contact, lose, touch
References in classic literature ?
As I now recall the scene of my first year, I do not believe that one often has the opportunity of coming into contact with three or four hundred men and women who were so tremendously in earnest as these men and women were.
Dealing with the beginnings of imagination in the minds of children, they record, with the reality which a very delicate touch preserves from anything lugubrious, not those merely preventible miseries of childhood over which some writers have been apt to gloat, but the contact of childhood with the great and inevitable sorrows of life, into which children can enter with depth, with dignity, and sometimes with a kind of simple, pathetic greatness, to the discipline of the heart.
Now this particular lion had never before come in contact with Tarzan of the Apes and he was much mystified.
Here the short stakes were set at intervals of about a foot around the walls near the top, their sharpened points inclining downward so that the lion had fallen unhurt into the trap but could not leap out because each time he essayed it his head came in contact with the sharp end of a stake above him.
Sheldon, with an eye to the camp and the preparations for the night, looked on and felt the pangs of jealousy at every contact of her hands with Tudor's face and body.
I had lost some hair and hide, here and there; the sharp and jagged end of a broken branch had thrust fully an inch into my forearm; and my right hip, which had borne the brunt of my contact with the ground, was aching intolerably.
The hand bent from the wrist and caressed him protectingly, and the warm contact of his velvet body put a change in Skipper's sick dreams, for he began to mutter in cold and bitter ominousness: "Any nigger that as much as bats an eye at that puppy.
Whatever his tongue could express would have appealed, in part, to her judgment; but the touch of hand, the fleeting contact, made its way directly to her instinct.
He halted with awkward abruptness, with stiff fore-legs bracing himself against his momentum, almost sitting down on his haunches, so desirous was he of avoiding contact with the dog he was in the act of attacking.
The font was of stone worn smooth by long-continued use, the four outer edges hollowed and polished by the contact of the countless Wieroo bodies that had leaned against them for how long a period of time Bradley could not even guess.
But I may come in contact with you," said the other, "if I come too close; and whether I hit you, or you hit me, I shall suffer for it.
Very well," said the Witch, "I will give you work in which you will be associated with intellect - you will come in contact with brains.
And it took twenty years of contact, of exchanging greetings and passing on with my tongue in my cheek, to develop in me a sneaking liking for the rascal.
Real character, he holds, the chief proper object of man's effort, is formed by quietly living, as did he and the dalesmen around him, in contact with Nature and communion with God rather than by participation in the feverish and sensational struggles of the great world.
Just like a human, the results to him of these contacts were sensations.