conspicuous

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conspicuous consumption

The lavish expenditure of money or acquisition of expensive items as a public display of one's wealth or financial success. In rapidly developing economies, conspicuous consumption becomes more and more prevalent as a means for those who have done well to flaunt their new economic status.
See also: conspicuous

be conspicuous by (one's) absence

To be noticeably missing from something. You're the loudest one in the class, so of course you're conspicuous by your absence!
See also: absence, conspicuous

conspicuous by (one's) absence

Noticeably missing from something. You're the loudest one in the class, so of course you're conspicuous by your absence!
See also: absence, conspicuous

*conspicuous by one's absence

Cliché noticeably absent (from an event). (*Typically: be ~; made ~.) How could the bride's father miss the wedding? He was certainly conspicuous by his absence.
See also: absence, conspicuous

make oneself conspicuous

to attract attention to oneself. Please don't make yourself conspicuous. It embarrasses me. Ann makes herself conspicuous by wearing brightly colored clothing.
See also: conspicuous, make

conspicuous by its absence

Also, conspicuous by one's absence. Glaringly obvious by the fact of not being there. For example, One agenda item concerning publicity is conspicuous by its absence, or The bride's father was conspicuous by his absence. The idea is ancient; it was expressed by the Roman writer Tacitus, concerning the absence of Junia's brother and husband at her funeral procession. [Mid-1800s]
See also: absence, conspicuous

conspicuous by your/its absence

If someone or something is conspicuous by their absence, people notice that they are not there. He played no part in the game and was conspicuous by his absence at the post-match celebrations. Mathematics and science were conspicuous by their absence at the university.
See also: absence, conspicuous

conspicuous by your absence

obviously not present in a place where you should be.
This phrase was coined by Lord John Russell in a speech made in 1859 . He acknowledged as his source for the idea a passage in Tacitus describing a procession of images at a funeral: the fact that those of Cassius and Brutus were absent attracted a great deal of attention.
See also: absence, conspicuous

conˌspicuous by your ˈabsence

not present in a situation or place, when it is obvious that you should be there: When it came to cleaning up afterwards, Anne was conspicuous by her absence.
See also: absence, conspicuous

conspicuous by its absence

Very obvious through nonattendance. This oxymoron, which goes back to ancient Rome, applies to people or objects that attracted attention because they were expected to be present but weren't. An example would be a close relative who either wasn't invited or chose not to attend a family function. Some literary commentators contend that the phrase has become a cliché, but it's now used so rarely, you may—although at your peril—claim its wit to be your own.
See also: absence, conspicuous
References in classic literature ?
As he said this, he made some memorandum in his pocket-book in which Mr Mantalini's name figured conspicuously, and finding by his watch that it was between nine and ten o'clock, made all speed home.
In the substance of his work Johnson is most conspicuously, and of set purpose, a moralist.
said Stepan Arkadyevitch, as conspicuously brilliant in the midst of all the Petersburg brilliance as he was in Moscow, his face rosy, and his whiskers sleek and glossy.
Resolute and wild of look, rapid of foot and yet weak and uncertain, conspicuously dressed in its black garments and with its hurried head-covering, gaunt and of an unearthly paleness, it pressed forward, taking no more heed of the throng than a sleep- walker.
She was a member of the Reverend Frank's congregation, and made a point of distinguishing herself in that body, by conspicuously weeping at everything, however cheering, said by the Reverend Frank in his public ministration; also by applying to herself the various lamentations of David, and complaining in a personally injured manner (much in arrear of the clerk and the rest of the respondents) that her enemies were digging pit-falls about her, and breaking her with rods of iron.
Riley, with the natural pride of a man who has a buxom wife conspicuously his inferior in intellect.
KARACHI -- Commissioner Karachi, Shoaib Ahmed Siddiqui has urged the consumers that while purchasing grocery they should insist that the shopkeepers display conspicuously the official price lists.
a) In the case of a raw agricultural commodity, on the package offered for retail sale, with the words 'genetically engineered' stated clearly and conspicuously on the front of the package of such a commodity, or in the case of such a commodity that is not separately packaged or labeled, on a label appearing on the retail store shelf or bin where such a commodity is displayed for sale;
Poised conspicuously on Cagliari's seafront, Hadid's agglomeration of fluidly plastic forms will be hard to avoid.
Varig was conspicuously absent from last weekend's Star Alliance meeting and ceremony in Istanbul, prompting speculation about whether or not the struggling Brazilian carrier remains a viable component of Star.
Augustine has historically been awarded to clergy and lay people of foreign churches who have contributed conspicuously to advancing friendly relations with the churches of the Anglican Communion," Lambeth Palace said in a statement.
Elmo, perhaps the most hyped toy of the season, is on the Toys ``R'' Us list but is conspicuously missing from Toy Books' top 20.
Without once uttering the words of his album's title (which sprung from a neighbor's comment overheard by his wife), Keith speaks crystal-clear, un-PC volumes about the conferral of privilege and the iconography of a continually in-flux experience of contextual whiteness placed in combat with conspicuously non-white cultures.
Conspicuously absent are any artist interviews of substance.
He often fails to appear at important meetings or, if he is present, often leaves conspicuously early.