connive at (something)

(redirected from conniving at)

connive at (something)

To plot or conspire about something. What are you kids whispering about back there? You better not be conniving at something!
See also: connive

connive at something (with someone)

 and connive (at something) with someone
to scheme at something (with someone); to plot something (with someone). Are you conniving at something with Ronald? Are you and Ronald conniving with Tom at something I should know about? Stop conniving with people!
See also: connive
References in classic literature ?
She waited until the cold and her fear of being discovered spying forced her to creep upstairs, ashamed of having enjoyed a silly entertainment, and of conniving at a breach of the rules rather than face a fresh quarrel with Agatha.
This was exactly what Sir Thomas and Edmund had been separately conniving at, as each proved to the other by the sympathetic alacrity with which they both advised Mrs.
If I were quiet at the moment, I was conniving at their disorderly conduct; if (as was frequently the case) I happened to be exalting my voice to enforce order, I was using undue violence, and setting the girls a bad example by such ungentleness of tone and language.
Changes had crept in, Marilla conniving at them resignedly, until it was as sweet and dainty a nest as a young girl could desire.
No strange robber, no treacherous host conniving at the plunder of his guests, or stealing to their beds to kill them in their sleep, no nightly prowler, however terrible and cruel, could have awakened in her bosom half the dread which the recognition of her silent visitor inspired.
He is even bringing or trying to bring the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds into this nonsense as if it were conniving at such destruction of both the soil and the wildlife of set aside.