confidence


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to confidence: confidence interval

con artist

1. A person who exploits the vulnerability of others for his or her own sake by manipulating and taking advantage of their confidence (the act of which is known as a confidence trick or game). It is the common abbreviation of the full term, "confidence artist." Be wary of con artists who send e-mails claiming to be a bank or some other trustworthy establishment: they often ask for your personal bank details to have access to your finances.
2. By extension, a person who is skilled at duplicity, cajolery, or self-serving manipulation or persuasion. John is such a con artist, always convincing others to pay for him on nights out under the pretense that he'll "pay them back later."
See also: artist, con

con man

1. A man who exploits the vulnerability of others for his own sake by manipulating and taking advantage of their confidence (the act of which is known as a confidence trick or game). It is the common abbreviation of the full term, "confidence man." Be wary of con men who send e-mails claiming to be a bank or some other trustworthy establishment: they often ask for your personal bank details so as to have access to your finances.
2. By extension, a man who is skilled at duplicity, cajolery, or self-serving manipulation or persuasion. John is such a con man, always convincing others to pay for him on nights out under the pretense that he'll "pay them back later."
See also: con, man

confidence-building measure

Any action taken to eliminate or reduce the fear of attack or escalation of conflict between two or more parties, as in international politics, interpersonal communication, business interactions, etc. The term is usually pluralized. The two countries, long on the brink of all-out war, have introduced several confidence-building measures between their governments to facilitate better communication and hopefully avert the need for a military offensive by either side. One of our goals in marriage counseling is to create confidence-building measures between spouses, so that each person learns to communicate their frustrations before they turn into a source of conflict.
See also: measure

have confidence in someone

to trust someone; to know that someone will be true. I have confidence in you, and I know you will do well. Randy tends not to have confidence in anyone.
See also: confidence, have

take someone into one's confidence

to trust someone with confidential information; to tell a secret to someone and trust the person to keep the secret. We are good friends, but I didn't feel I could take her into my confidence. I know something very important about Jean. Can I take you into my confidence?
See also: confidence, take

vote of confidence

Fig. a poll taken to discover whether or not a person, party, etc., still has the majority's support. The government easily won the vote of confidence called for by the opposition. The president of the club resigned when one of the members called for a vote of confidence in his leadership.
See also: confidence, of, vote

in (the strictest) confidence

trusting that something said will not be told to anyone else She told me her plans in confidence, and I really can't talk to anyone about them.
See also: confidence

confidence game

Also, confidence trick; con game. A swindle in which the victim is defrauded after his or her trust has been won. For example, The police warned of a confidence game in which people were asked to turn over valuables for a so-called appraisal , or The typical confidence trick is easy to spot if you know what to look for, or I almost let myself be taken in by her con game-she seemed so sincere. These terms, which use confidence in the sense of "trust," date from the mid-1800s. They also gave rise to confidence man (or con man) for the swindler.
See also: confidence, game

in confidence

Also, in strict confidence. Privately, on condition that what is said will not be revealed. For example, The doctor told her in confidence that her mother was terminally ill, or He told us in strict confidence that Gail was pregnant. This idiom was first recorded in 1632. Also see take into one's confidence.
See also: confidence

take into one's confidence

Trust someone with a secret, as in She took me into her confidence and admitted that she was quitting next month. This idiom uses confidence in the sense of "trust," a usage dating from the late 1500s.
See also: confidence, take

con man

and con artist
n. someone who makes a living by swindling people. Gary is a con artist, but at least he’s not on the dole. I was taken by a real con man!
See also: con, man

con artist

verb
See also: artist, con
References in classic literature ?
Very good, my dear,' replied Mrs Nickleby, with great confidence.
If it be otherwise, I have that confidence in Kate that I know she will feel as I do--and in you, dear mother, to be assured that after a little consideration you will do the same.
To stroll through the fields, to be alone together at times if we wished it, to look over an old water-mill, to sit beneath a tree in some lovely glen among the hills, the lovers' talks, the sweet confidences drawn forth by which each made some progress day by day in the other's heart.
I recollect, on both occasions of our passing that ill- fated Cairo on the Mississippi, remarking on the bad effects such gross deceits must have when they exploded, in generating a want of confidence abroad, and discouraging foreign investment: but I was given to understand that this was a very smart scheme by which a deal of money had been made: and that its smartest feature was, that they forgot these things abroad, in a very short time, and speculated again, as freely as ever.
And this brings me to a point on which I have, ever since I landed in the United States last November, observed a strict silence, though sometimes tempted to break it, but in reference to which I will, with your good leave, take you into my confidence now.
Harthouse,' returned Sissy, with a blending of gentleness and steadiness that quite defeated him, and with a simple confidence in his being bound to do what she required, that held him at a singular disadvantage, 'the only reparation that remains with you, is to leave here immediately and finally.
If I were to do such a very ridiculous thing,' he said, stopping again presently, and leaning against the chimney-piece, 'it could only be in the most inviolable confidence.
But there are unexpressed confidences, Mr Clennam; and as you have been together intimately among these people, I cannot doubt that a confidence of that sort exists in the present case.
He would have thought, had this introduction to his mother been brought about by him because he knew what she would say, and that he could thus place his position before a rival and loftily warn him off, without himself reposing a word of confidence in him?
So far from troubling you with any new confidence, I merely wish to remind you what the old one was.
Mr Twemlow, if you should chance to see my husband, or to see me, or to see both of us, in the favour or confidence of any one else--whether of our common acquaintance or not, is of no consequence--you have no right to use against us the knowledge I intrusted you with, for one special purpose which has been accomplished.
Lightwood replies that he was consulted certainly, but could give no opinion which would pay off the Bill of Sale, and therefore violates no confidence in supposing that it came of their living beyond their means.
says Eugene over his shoulder, in confidence, with the Analytical.
Waiting,' returns the Analytical in responsive confidence.