confide in


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confide in someone

to trust someone with one's secrets or personal matters. Sally always confided in her sister Ann. She didn't feel that she could confide in her mother.

confide something in someone

 and confide something to someone
to tell a secret or private matter to someone, trusting that the person will not reveal the secret. I learned not to confide anything secret in Bob. Tom really needed to confide his inner fears to someone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Maybe he just needs someone to confide in because he can't talk to his girlfriend.
It's more about letting her know that she can confide in you if she needs to rather than a conversation about the birds and the bees.
Joshi was polite when he said the ship was the result of " exceptional perseverance", Antony remarked, " Now that the ship is ours, I can confide in you.
Finally she feels she has someone she can confide in.
I just want you to listen because I want to be able to confide in you.
London, June 15 (ANI): It has emerged that two thirds of Britons confide in their colleagues rather then their loved ones.
Women are most likely to confide in a friend although 50 per cent think it's acceptable to betray a friend's trust if they confide in their partner.
Having you to confide in must have been a great help.
What we didnt bank on was how quickly these are passed on by those we confide in.
Therefore, it has always been a natural thing to confide in your minister, provided that you truly feel that you "have faith in" or can trust him or her.
On the first page she wrote: "I hope I will be able to confide everything to you, as I have never been able to confide in anyone, and I hope you will be a great source of comfort and support.
And why should our quite sick, blood-painting, child-murdering friend confide in a man he doesn't know and who doesn't know him?
A HOW lucky your sister is to have someone like you to confide in.
Confide in an aunt or friend's mom or even the lady you babysit for.