condition

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out of condition

Not in good physical health; not especially strong, healthy, or fit. I've gotten pretty out of condition from working behind this desk for 10 years. I'd like to run a marathon this autumn, but I'm a little out of condition.
See also: condition, of, out

mint condition

The state of an object that is in perfect condition, as if it has never been touched or otherwise used. The phrase originally referred to coins that were never put into circulation and thus remained in the same pristine condition as when they were produced at the mint. There's no way I'm selling my mint condition Babe Ruth rookie card—I don't care how much money it would get, it's one of my most prized possessions!
See also: condition, mint

be in mint condition

To be in pristine condition with no evidence of use or wear. My brother made a lot of money selling vintage baseball cards that were in mint condition. My family goes to the auto show every year because we all love seeing classic cars that are in mint condition.
See also: condition, mint

condition (someone or something) to (something)

1. To train someone or an animal to do something in a particular way or to act in a certain way. Years of office work have conditioned me to get up at 6 AM, even on the weekends. The dog has been conditioned to run to his bowl when I open the cabinet where we store his food.
2. To acclimate someone or an animal to something. It will take time to condition ourselves to the pace of life in our sleepy new town. How long will it take to condition the dog to our commands?
See also: condition

condition someone or something to something

 
1. to train or adapt someone or an animal to do something. I conditioned the dog to beg for a treat. Over the years, he had conditioned himself to run for hours at a stretch.
2. to train or adapt someone or an animal to something. We could never condition the cat to the finer points of domestication. I conditioned myself to the extreme cold.
See also: condition

in a delicate condition

Euph. pregnant. (Old fashioned.) Are you sure you're up for this hike? I know you're in a delicate condition. She shouldn't be lifting those boxes. She's in a delicate condition.
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*in an interesting condition

Euph. pregnant. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) Young Mrs. Lutin is in an interesting condition. The bride appeared to be in an interesting condition.

in condition

 and in(to) shape
in good health; strong and healthy; fit. Bob exercises frequently, so he's in condition. If I were in shape, Icould run faster and farther. I'm really overweight. I have to try to get into shape.
See also: condition

*in good shape

 and *in good condition physically and functionally sound and sturdy. (Used for both people and things. *Typically: be ~; get ~; keep ~.)
This car isn't in good shape. I'd like to have one that's in better condition. Mary is in good condition. She exercises and eats right to stay healthy. You have to make an effort to get into good shape.
See also: good, shape

*in mint condition

Fig. in perfect condition. (*Typically: be ~;find something ~.) This is a fine car. It runs well and is in mint condition. We saw a house in mint condition and decided to buy it.
See also: condition, mint

send someone into a state or condition

to cause someone to be in a certain state or condition. The horrifying news sent our family into hysterics. The clerk's rude behavior sent the customer into a fit of anger.
See also: condition, send, state

under certain circumstances

 and under certain conditions
Fig. depending on or influenced by something; because of something. Under certain conditions, you can see across the lake to the other side. Under certain circumstances, what you propose to do is all right.

under certain circumstances

because of particular conditions Your insurance will pay for that surgery, but only under certain circumstances, for example if it's an emergency.

be in mint condition

if something is in mint condition, it looks as if it is new
Usage notes: The mint is a place where new coins are made.
There's an ad here for a 1974 Volkswagen Beetle. It's dark blue and in mint condition, apparently.
See also: condition, mint

in condition

Also, in good condition or shape ; in shape. Physically fit; also, in a state of readiness. For example, I've got to get in condition before the next road race, or This project's in good shape now, or Is this report in shape to show to the president? The first expression dates from the late 1700s; the use of shape for "a state of health or repair" dates from the mid-1800s. The antonyms of these expressions, out of condition and out of shape, date from the mid-1800s. For example, Their stock was out of condition and not suitable for selling, or I'm so out of shape that I can barely run a mile.
See also: condition

in good condition

Also, in good shape. See in condition
See also: condition, good

mint condition, in

In excellent condition, unblemished, perfect, as in This car is in mint condition. This expression alludes to the condition of a freshly minted coin. [c. 1900]
See also: mint

on condition that

Provided that, with the restriction that, as in She said she'd help with the costumes on condition that she would get ten free tickets to the play . The use of the noun condition in the sense of "stipulation" dates from the late 1300s, and the precise phrase from the early 1500s.
See also: condition, on

out of condition

Also, out of shape. See under in condition.
See also: condition, of, out
References in classic literature ?
They direct their attacks not against the bourgeois conditions of production, but against the instruments of production themselves; they destroy imported wares that compete with their labour, they smash to pieces machinery, they set factories ablaze, they seek to restore by force the vanished status of the workman of the Middle Ages.
The various interests and conditions of life within the ranks of the proletariat are more and more equalised, in proportion as machinery obliterates all distinctions of labour, and nearly everywhere reduces wages to the same low level.
We were brought back to a realization of our present conditions by a messenger bearing a summons from Lorquas Ptomel directing me to appear before him forthwith.
There exist guns, according to Fulton, perfected in England by Philip Coles and Burley, in France by Furcy, and in Italy by Landi, which are furnished with a peculiar system of closing, which can fire under these conditions.
As I walked I was watching for every impression that could possibly help to explain the condition of ruinous splendour in which I found the world--for ruinous it was.
Such conditions are therefore termed, not qualities, but affections.
I don't care what the conditions are," the doctor said slowly.
As many more individuals of each species are born than can possibly survive; and as, consequently, there is a frequently recurring struggle for existence, it follows that any being, if it vary however slightly in any manner profitable to itself, under the complex and sometimes varying conditions of life, will have a better chance of surviving, and thus be naturally selected.
It appears from the character of the fossils in Europe, Asia, Australia, and in North and South America, that those conditions which favour the life of the
He alone would suffice to carry Nietzsche's point against all those who are opposed to the other conditions, to the conditions which would have saved Rome, which have maintained the strength of the Jewish race, and which are strictly maintained by every breeder of animals throughout the world.
5) material, and (6) religious points of view; thirdly, that evidence should be required from the rival department of the measures that had been taken during the last ten years by that department for averting the disastrous conditions in which the native tribes were now placed; and fourthly and finally, that that department explain why it had, as appeared from the evidence before the committee, from No.
We came next day to Mazna, in so wretched a condition that we were not surprised at being hooted by the boys, but thought ourselves well used that they threw no stones at us.
To him he made over all that he knew as to the events above recorded, and as to the present condition of the prince.
Very ill; frighted almost to death with the apprehensions of my sad condition - to be sick, and no help.
But I had too much to say to him to be affronted, and told him in few words, that I was far from coming to insult him, but at best I came to condole mutually; that he would be easily satisfied that I had no such view, when I should tell him that my condition was worse than his, and that many ways.
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