condescend


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condescend to do something

to agree to do something that is humbling or belittling. I will not condescend to respond to that remark. "Will you condescend to join us for dinner?" teased Bob.
See also: condescend

condescend to someone

to talk down to someone; to treat people as if they were below oneself; to patronize someone. Please do not condescend to me. There is no need to condescend to the children. They are just small, not stupid.
See also: condescend
References in classic literature ?
There would be new boys to condescend to, and there would be tales of holiday adventures to hear.
But I don't know whether you will condescend to such a task," said she, laughing, "now that you are so taken up with the notion of putting spirit into machinery.
I wonder whether it would condescend to alight on such a great clumsy finger as mine?
He had condescended to mortgage as far as he had the power, but he would never condescend to sell.
But Laure refused to condescend to an act of espial which no curiosity could justify, and she consequently became the object of much reprobation.
The woman seemed as if she would not--could not-- condescend to exhibit any concern or interest in such a creature.
If your Majesty would condescend to state your case," he remarked, "I should be better able to advise you.
Now, if your pretty granddaughter --excuse me, miss--will condescend to take care of this pipe for two months, we shall save the cost of one next time.
You look as though you had never heard of him; but as the cricket and racing are the only part of your paper that you condescend to read, you can't be expected to keep track of all the peers created in your time.
I felt sure that I was followed in the street, and my every movement dogged by those to whom I would not condescend to turn and look.
Falk obeys the law of self-preservation without the slightest misgivings as to his right, but at a crucial turn of that ruthlessly preserved life he will not condescend to dodge the truth.
When a lady condescends to apologise, there is no keeping one's anger, of course; so we parted good friends for once; and this time I squeezed her hand with a cordial, not a spiteful pressure.