come about

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come about

1. To happen or materialize. This great job offer came about very quickly—I only interviewed for it a few days ago! I didn't realize that you were dating John. How did that come about?
2. To change the direction in which a ship is traveling. We need to come about because it seems we've gone off-course.
See also: come

come to pass

To happen. The phrase often indicates that what is happening is the result of a course of events. Our only hope now is that these dire predictions will not come to pass, but can be avoided somehow. When it finally came to pass, it almost felt like a letdown.
See also: come, pass

come about

 
1. to happen. How did this damage come about? This came about due to the windstorm.
2. [for a ship or boat] to turn. Look how easily this boat comes about. Now, practice making the boat come about.
See also: come

come to pass

to happen; to take place. And when do you think all these good things will come to pass? Do you think it will really come to pass?
See also: come, pass

go about something

to approach the doing of something in a particular way. How should I go about researching this topic? Would you tell me how to go about it?

go about

 and go around 
1. [for a rumor] to go from person to person. What is this story about you that I hear going about? There was a nasty rumor about Gerald going around.
2. [for a disease] to spread. There is a lot of this flu going about these days. There is a bad cough going around.
3. Go to go around someone or something.

come about

1. Also, come to pass. Happen, take place, as in How did this quarrel come about? or When did this new development come to pass? Shakespeare used the first term, first recorded in 1315, in Hamlet (5:2): "How these things came about." The variant, dating from the late 1400s, appears often in the Bible, as in, "And it came to pass ... that there went out a decree from Caesar Augustus" (Luke 2:1).
2. Also, go about. In sailing, to change tack (direction), as in It's important to duck under the boom when we come about. [Mid-1500s]
See also: come

go about

1. Also, go around. Move here and there, to and fro; also, circulate. For example, She's been going about telling everyone the news, or A report went around that the dollar was dropping. [c. 1300]
2. Set about, undertake, as in I'm not sure how to go about making a pie. [Late 1600s]
3. go about one's business. Proceed with one's own proper occupation or concern. For example, Don't bother with that-just go about your business. [Late 1600s]

come about

v.
1. To happen; come to pass: It came about that John and Mary got married and had three children.
2. To change tack. Used of sailing vessels: We were about to come about when the wind suddenly died down.
See also: come

go about

v.
1. To go from place to place in some area, doing something openly and habitually: All summer, the bees go about the garden collecting pollen.
2. To execute some routine: From my office on the top floor, I could observe all the city's workers going about their business.
3. To walk around or appear in public, especially in a particular state of dress: I don't know why you always go about in that silly hat.
4. To undertake something in a particular way: How does one go about finding an apartment? Your application could take weeks if you don't go about it in the right way.

come to pass

To occur.
See also: come, pass