come to terms with


Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to come to terms with: On a par, bent on, come off, in line with, off base, amount to, bring to the table, give rise to

come to terms with (someone or something)

To begin to or make an effort to understand, accept, and deal with a difficult or problematic person, thing, or situation. I should have the report ready for you by this afternoon, I just need to come to terms with this new software update first. I've tried, but I just can't come to terms with Amy, she's totally out of control!
See also: come, term

come to terms with

come to accept a new and painful or difficult event or situation.
See also: come, term

come to terms with

1. To come to accept; become reconciled to: finally came to terms with his lack of talent.
2. To reach mutual agreement: The warring factions have at last come to terms.
See also: come, term
References in periodicals archive ?
Watkins's realization that pretense and masking may backfire and merely reaffirm racist stereotypes--"for many of [the white students], the Screaming Niggers remained caricatures, confirmed members of an alien class who, however talented, encouraged and happily acceded to the role of amusing, one-dimensional exotics"--is deferred until the end of Dancing with Strangers, a remarkable memoir of the former New York Times Book Review editor's experiences as a boy struggling to navigate the labyrinth of race relations in the mid-twentieth-century American Midwest and later as a student at an elite eastern university attempting to come to terms with his identity as an African American.
How can I come to terms with good and evil in my nation's history?