come to a full stop

come to a full stop

1. To physically halt forward motion. When you take your driving test, remember to come to a full stop at every stop sign. Every driver came to a full stop as the police car, with its flashing lights and siren, sped by.
2. To reach an end point, often abruptly or due to difficulties. My research has come to a full stop because every experiment I've tried so far has failed.
See also: come, full, stop

come to a full ˈstop

(British English) stop unexpectedly before something is or seems to be finished: It’s a very strange book — you’re in the middle of the story and it suddenly comes to a full stop.She came to a full stop and seemed unable to go on with her speech.
Full stop here refers to the mark ( . ) used at the end of a sentence.
See also: come, full, stop
References in classic literature ?
Tom and his father had several consultations and conducted several experiments in regard to the new stabilizer, the completion of which was so earnestly desired.
He bore a reputation for wisdom rather than skill--leaving the active practice of medicine to his assistants and younger contemporaries--and was much sought for in matters of consultation.
Gradually, however, these symptoms of disorder diminished; and in a few minutes the oldest and most distinguished chiefs were assembled in the lodge, in grave consultation.
The children had many consultations together about what father and mother would do, and how they could help to earn money.
Marie had held several consultations with her lawyer; after communicating with St.
Gore then, without consultation or deliberation with any one, not even giving Demby an additional call, raised his musket to his face, taking deadly aim at his standing victim, and in an instant poor Demby was no more.
Thus they thir doubtful consultations dark Ended rejoycing in thir matchless Chief: As when from mountain tops the dusky clouds Ascending, while the North wind sleeps, o'respread Heav'ns chearful face, the lowring Element Scowls ore the dark'nd lantskip Snow, or showre; If chance the radiant Sun with farewell sweet Extend his ev'ning beam, the fields revive, The birds thir notes renew, and bleating herds Attest thir joy, that hill and valley rings.
They were a good deal taken aback, and after a little consultation one and all tumbled down the fore companion, thinking no doubt to take us on the rear.
The first question of course was, how to get dry again: they had a consultation about this, and after a few minutes it seemed quite natural to Alice to find herself talking familiarly with them, as if she had known them all her life.
At length, after long consultation, the Cat said, 'I know of no place where it could be better put than in the church.
Our camel drivers getting together to consult on this occasion, we suspected they had some ill design in hand, and got ready our weapons; they perceived our apprehensions, and set us at ease by letting us know the reason of their consultation.
Let us pause, my fellow-citizens, for one moment, over this melancholy and monitory lesson of history; and with the tear that drops for the calamities brought on mankind by their adverse opinions and selfish passions, let our gratitude mingle an ejaculation to Heaven, for the propitious concord which has distinguished the consultations for our political happiness.
The history of almost all the great councils and consultations held among mankind for reconciling their discordant opinions, assuaging their mutual jealousies, and adjusting their respective interests, is a history of factions, contentions, and disappointments, and may be classed among the most dark and degraded pictures which display the infirmities and depravities of the human character.
Heidegger was accustomed to hold consultations in all difficult cases of his practice.
In this chair, likewise, did those excellent governors preside while holding consultations with the chief councillors of the province, who were styled assistants.