come aboard

come aboard

To board a ship or boat. Once the boat docks, you can come aboard.
See also: aboard, come

come aboard

 and go aboard
to get onto a boat or ship. Please come aboard. We are shoving off now. Please ask everyone to go aboard.
See also: aboard, come
References in classic literature ?
Not enough to speak of --two islanders, that's all; --but come aboard, old hearty, come along.
Throw down your arms and come aboard us," I cried, "and you shall not be harmed.
Eight others were stationed with leather water-bags to quench any fire-arrows which might come aboard, while others were sent up the mast, to lie along the yard and drop stones or shoot arrows as the occasion served.
And by ten o'clock we were quit of Genoa; the last lean, blue-chinned official had left our decks; the last fruitseller had been beaten off with bucketsful of water and left cursing us from his boat; the last passenger had come aboard at the last moment--a fussy graybeard who kept the big ship waiting while he haggled with his boatman over half a lira.
Come aboard, come aboard; never mind about the papers.
The studio also announced that Larry Charles ("Borat," "Bruno") has come aboard to direct.
Ian thought 16-year-old Jordan, not the biggest of lads, had just hooked into a good-sized mackerel or cod and was struggling bringing it in, until he looked over the gunwales and saw a cracking pollock, which when weighed was found to be the biggest fish to come aboard Ian's boat at a meaty 11lb.