come/go with the territory

come with the territory

To typically accompany a certain situation; to be a usual consequence or related issue. When you're the boss, staying late at the office just comes with the territory. Sleep deprivation comes with the territory of being a new parent.
See also: come, territory

go with the territory

To typically accompany a certain situation; to be a usual consequence or related issue. When you're the boss, staying late at the office just goes with the territory. Sleep deprivation goes with the territory of being a new parent.
See also: territory

come with the territory

 and go with the territory
Fig. to be expected under circumstances like this. (Alludes to the details and difficulties attendant to something like the assignment of a specific sales territory to a salesperson. When one accepts the assignment, one accepts the problems.) There is a lot of paperwork in this job. Oh, well, I guess it comes with the territory. There are problems, but they go with the territory.
See also: come, territory

come with the territory

Accompany specific circumstances, as in You may not like the new coach, but he comes with the territory, or As the editor, you may not like listening to complaints, but it comes with the territory. This term uses territory in the sense of "sales district," and the phrase originally meant that traveling sales personnel had to accept whatever problems or perquisites they found in their assigned region. Today it is applied in many other contexts. [Second half of 1900s]
See also: come, territory

go with the territory

If something goes with the territory, it is a normal and necessary part of a situation, so you have to accept it. If you're a world-class footballer, that level of media attention goes with the territory and you have to learn to live with it. Note: You can also say that something comes with the territory. If you're foreign, being misunderstood comes with the territory.
See also: territory

go (or come) with the territory

be an unavoidable result of a particular situation.
Territory is probably used here in its early 20th-century US sense of ‘the area in which a sales representative or distributor has the right to operate’.
See also: territory

ˌcome/ˌgo with the ˈterritory

be a normal and accepted part of a particular job, situation, etc: As a doctor, he has to work long hours and some weekends, but that goes with the territory I suppose.
See also: come, territory