column


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Related to column: column chromatography, beam

a little from column A, a little from column B

Having been formed from two distinct factors, elements, or reasons. She asked me if I drew more from real life or from my imagination when writing; in truth, it's a little from column A and a little from column B.
See also: column, little

fifth column

A clandestine group of people who work subversively within a group, organization, or country in order to betray it to an allied outside force. In the US during the Cold War, there was constant fear and suspicion of people supposedly working in a fifth column to spread the influence of communism from within.
See also: column, fifth

dodge the column

To avoid doing some job or task. Primarily heard in UK. Oh, she's not really sick—she's just trying to dodge the column and leave me with all her work!
See also: column, dodge

fifth column

A secret subversive group that works against a country or organization from the inside, as in The government feared that there was a fifth column working to oppose its policies during the crisis . This term was invented by General Emilio Mola during the Spanish Civil War in a radio broadcast on October 16, 1936, in which he said that he had una quinta columna ("a fifth column") of sympathizers for General Franco among the Republicans holding the city of Madrid, and it would join his four columns of troops when they attacked. The term was popularized by Ernest Hemingway and later extended to any traitorous insiders.
See also: column, fifth

dodge the column

shirk your duty; avoid work. British informal
Column is a military term which refers to the usual formation of troops for marching.
See also: column, dodge

fifth column

an organized group of people sympathizing with and working for the enemy within a country at war or otherwise under attack.
Fifth column is a translation of the Spanish phrase quinta columna : during the Spanish Civil War, an extra body of supporters was claimed by General Mola as being within Madrid when he besieged the city with four columns of Nationalist forces in 1936 .
See also: column, fifth
References in periodicals archive ?
The result will be a newly inserted column for 2014 while the formulas in the Statistics column will continue to average columns D:H, as shown in Figure 2.
In this paper, a CCFT column with a reinforcing cage for the pier connected to the lower part of the column by several couplers is applied to a pre-founded column instead of an H-shaped column and it is illustrated in Fig.
Column 11: Percentage of absences which are unauthorised
My self-assigned project resulted in nearly 100 columns that ran in The Kansas City Star on what may have been the newspaper's longest series on education.
If I had written this column after Veronica Brenner and Deidra Dionne had won their freestyle aerialist ski jump it would have been about simple awe.
Grigg responds: In a December 5th syndicated column by White House correspondent Helen Thomas, Mr.
2+] ions in the hydrated layer are also close to those of the column [Ca.
Should doubts persist about Post favoritism, there is the monthly Henry Kissinger column.
Column cages house lifts and ducts and bring light into the interior.
The Ro/Ro loading of the vacuum column required 40 axle lines of self-propelled modular trailers (SPMTs).
Hall's dream became a reality three months after that meeting: her column is published in the Sun-Sentinel every Thursday and Saturday.
His colleagues at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston had recently discovered a string of nerves that appeared to carry pain messages from the pelvic organs through a section of the spinal cord known as the dorsal column.
The following is an excerpt from the latest GC Reference Guide Seminar Manual about Column Installation.