collapse into

collapse into something

 
1. Lit. to fall down into something with suddenness, as if out of energy. She was so tired, she collapsed into the chair. Juan collapsed into a chair and fell fast asleep.
2. Fig. [for someone] to fall into a particular kind of despair. The poor man collapsed into a deep depression. Scott collapsed into his own personal brand of grieving.
See also: collapse
References in periodicals archive ?
Tonight's debut episode examines bridges - the danger involved in building them, how they work and why they don't collapse into the drink (or, on a couple of occasions, why they did: famous footage of the collapse of the Tacoma Narrows is included).
Recent theoretical work suggests that a sufficiently large number of lithium atoms congregated in a state of matter known as a Bose-Einstein condensate can likewise collapse into a denser state, then explode.
Bruno Bettelheim, himself a prisoner at Dachau, observed these figures in his 1960 Informed Heart and recorded in detail their psychic collapse into what came to be called Musselmanner (because their passivity fit the European image of "fanatical" Muslims).
The notion of stellar winds associated with newborn stars -- whatever their origin -- provides a plausible, though controversial, explanation for why all the mass of a molecular cloud doesn't collapse into stars.
Normally, the faint light emitted by clouds just starting to collapse into galaxies would be lost in the background light of the night sky.