coin money

coin money

To earn a very large amount of money, especially by doing something very successfully. We'll be coining money if we can manage to secure a trading partner in China. I hear Sarah been coining money with sales from her latest novel.
See also: coin, money

coin money

Also, mint money. Make a great deal of money easily or very quickly. For example, With a monopoly on the market he could coin money, or These highly motivated realtors just about enable the agency to mint money. This hyperbolic expression dates from the mid-1800s.
See also: coin, money
References in periodicals archive ?
The Constitution provides, "Congress shall have the power to coin money [and] regulate the value thereof.
To coin Money, regulate the Value thereof, and of foreign Coin, and fix the Standard of Weights and Measures";
Since the coin money was introduced into the market, prices of goods and services still remain very high.
About all this, die Constitution merely says in Article I, Section 8, Clause 5, that Congress shall have the power "To coin Money, regulate the Value thereof, and of foreign Coin.
Constitution, which delegates to Congress the power to coin money, the government brought suit.
Its job was to coin money for the upper classes to use--mostly gold.
Cowrie shells were used as money in China in 1200 BC, and about 600 years later Lydians were credited to be the first to coin money and open retail outlets.
NEWHALL - Twenty-six years ago, students at Hart High School thought the year 2000 would be a year of high technology, a time when coin money would be obsolete and platform shoes would be history.
If you're in the cash business it is hard not to coin money, so the shares look a good buy.
Now the Constitution gives Congress the right to coin money and regulate the value thereof, but it does not give it the right to manufacture dollars out of thin air.
Marshall argued that if the government had the right to coin money, which the Constitution gave it, it had the implied right to establish a bank.
Second, the General Government could provide such currencies for everyone's use, through the exercise of Congress's power "[t]o coin Money, regulate the Value thereof, and of foreign Coin" in Article I, Section 8, Clause 5 of the Constitution.
The Constitution, in Article I, Section 8, gives Congress the power "To coin money and regulate the value thereof," and stipulates that no state shall be permitted to "emit bills of credit.
Next, the Council ruled that it was the Crown's exclusive prerogative to make or coin money (71) and that "it appertaineth to the King only to put a value upon coin, and make the price of the quantity, and to put a print to it; which being done the coin is current.
The decision of May 1, 1871, found the power to issue legal tender implied in the power to coin money and wage war.